Senior Supply Chain Manager

  1. Contract
Negotiable
BBBH163797

Dublin

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Senior Supply Chain Manager

24 Month Contract

Dublin

Our client is a biopharmaceutical company that discovers, develops and commercialises innovative medicines. With each new discovery and investigational drug candidate, we seek to improve the care of patients living with life-threatening diseases around the world. Areas of focus include HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, cancer and inflammation, and serious respiratory and cardiovascular conditions.

The Position: Senior Supply Chain Manager (Supporting Distribution & Customer Services)

Key Responsibilities.

To support the Director of Supply Chain and Site Lead, The Associate Director of Supply Chain and the Senior Supply Chain Manager and the Distribution Manager to Lead, manage and develop the Distribution and customer services teams.
To support and deploy the development of industry best practice procedures for optimizing the movement of product throughout Supply Chain.

Supply Chain Customer Services duties.

Monitor & report on service levels and volumes ensuring that Key Performance Indicators are being met
Frequently collaborate with other departments, to ensure functional area resources are sufficient to achieve project goals and objectives.
Handle customer escalations to resolution ensuring corrective actions are taken as necessary to deliver the desired results.
Work with the Manufacturing team in to ensure timely product supply to meet customer orders
Initiate and support improvements to processes, systems and equipment to achieve higher levels of efficiency in coping with business growth.
Plan, prioritize and delegate work tasks to ensure proper functioning of the department in collaboration with the Distribution team
Manage our Logistics partners by having the appropriate agreements in place and conducting regular service/delivery performance reviews
Ensure the appropriate customs procedures are documented and that there is review mechanism in place to drive compliance
Understand international shipping requirements and customs regulations

Supply Chain Distribution duties.

To support the Distribution centre team to achieve the required performance targets.
Interacting and liaising with the customer services teams locally and internationally to prioritise orders and to provide a best in class service.
Liaising with the Freight and Distribution teams internally and externally monitoring the service levels of the providers through monthly performance reviews to ensure the required standard of service is being delivered consistently in accordance with the Service Level Agreements.
Provide monthly KPI reports to management including causal analysis of unfavourable variances and corrective action plans as per targets and as agreed with the Distribution Centres Associate manager.
Ensure GDP compliance by the transportation providers to Gilead SOPs, relating to the transportation of products, and any other legal or Regulatory requirements.
Through policy and procedure improvement/changes, develop inventory processes to minimise risk and improve compliance in the Distribution centre In Line with GMP & GDP requirements.
Managing process and material flows, space management, to maximise utilisation of the Distribution centre.
Establish and support a work environment of continuous improvement that supports Quality policy, Quality management system and the appropriate regulations for the area they support
Maintaining best in class housekeeping policies within the Distribution centre using the 5S principles and methodologies.
People management - supervision of the Distribution centre team to ensure that all customers (both internal and external) requirements are serviced in line with expectations. This will be achieved through the application of an empowering style of leadership which draws fully on resources and capabilities of the team coupled with a positive employee relations approach.
Manage communications and periodic reviews with all staff members, ensuring all performance issues are dealt with in a constructive and prompt manner.
Facilitate open two-way communications regarding individual, team and company performance through weekly team meetings and daily interaction on the line.


Knowledge, Experience and Skills:

7+ years of relevant experience in related field and a BS or BA; or 5+ years of relevant experience and a MA/MBA.
Experience in pharmaceutical operations/cGMP environment highly desirable.
Bachelor of Science / Engineering or relevant qualification.
Supervisory / Management qualification - desirable.
3 /4 years' experience in a supervisory capacity in a GMP/GDP focused Distribution centre. Previous experience in medical device/pharmaceutical environment would be an advantage.
Excellent knowledge of GMP/GDP/FDA regulatory requirements, housekeeping, health and safety.
Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
Previous experience of people-management and demonstrated ability in people motivation, organising and team building would be a distinct advantage
Solid record of attention to detail and strict adherence to procedures
Previous experience or working knowledge of the Lean principles and methodologies would be an distinct advantage
Building and managing partnerships cross functionally
Excellent knowledge of the logistics and distribution industry including an awareness of relevant legislation
Excellent analytical skills to analyse and interpret challenging business situations and determine strategy
Excellent leadership, decision-making and influencing skills to drive results and the ability to work effectively across all levels of the organisation
Ability to work on own initiative, innovate and review current processes and practices
Knowledge and experience with ERP systems, WMS / IM and TMS systems in general. Preferably SAP.

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