Strategy Manager Corporate Finance

  1. Permanent
€65,000 - €80,000 per annum + Bonus, Benefits, Health, Pension etc
MFOTS-YE44

Dublin City Centre, Dublin

The details

Strategy Manager - M&A Corporate Finance

A unique role to focus on Post Merger/Acquisition/Deals from a Strategic advice perspective.

Having demonstrated excellence in delivering this service on a Global scale our client is very keen on developing their capability in this area within an Irish Context but also with a global view client wise.

This is a newly created position and will focus on delivery key strategic advice to a range of diverse clients post-merger and or acquisition, IPO or Target Operating model change.

The role:

  • Advise senior clients across all sectors, supporting key decision makers in developing, shaping and executing strategies for transactions.
  • Provide dedicated support to different types of engagements, including pre-deal (e.g. operational and IT due diligence, carve-out planning), and post-deal (e.g. integration planning, synergy tracking).
  • Lead blended project teams comprising colleagues from our transactions and advisory practices as well as leading meetings with client stakeholders to advise, shape and drive the planning for integration, carve-out / separation and operational restructuring
  • Contribute to the management of complex engagements, including commercials, resourcing and risk.
  • Support the development and growth of our business, and actively engage with delivery of pitches and presentations to senior clients.
  • Act as a role model and support development of team members, coupled with the recruitment and training responsibilities.
  • Adapt a flexible approach to support on broader Operational and IT transaction work

We are ideally seeking a Project Management professional who has demonstrated experience in working with Post Deal transactions in either a Strategy or Delivery context. Experience in Transaction Services and or Corporate Finance would be an advantage however not a pre requisite as the position will focus on Strategic Project delivery and advice to clients post M&A activity.

You will have gained at least 5 years' experience and will be keen to join a newly formed division and develop your career within a newly defined service line.

For further information please Matt Fitzpatrick at Marks Sattin.

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