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How to resign the right way, and navigate a counter-offer conversation
How to resign the right way, and navigate a counter-offer conversation

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General

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Career Advice

12/08/20

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Even the best of job opportunities have their downsides, and the decision to change jobs should never be made lightly. Once the decision has been made, however, it should be firm and final, because reversing it could be a costly career mistake.Assuming you have been a valued employee, your company will not want to lose you, particularly in the short term, and will likely extend you a counter offer – a flattering inducement designed to tempt you into changing your mind. But as tempting and ego-gratifying as accepting a counter offer may be, interviews with employees who have succumbed to them have shown that the majority suffered setbacks later in their careers. " If the person resigning is a key employee, the manager and company will generally make whatever promises it takes to influence a reversal of the decision to terminate. Changing jobs can be an intense process, and companies know they stand a good chance of keeping the employee – at least for a while – if they can just 'press the right buttons'.  Before you let the flattery of a counter offer tempt you, consider these universally accepted truths below:No matter what the company may say, you will forever be considered a flight risk. Having once demonstrated your 'lack of loyalty' by having looked for another job, you will lose your status as a 'team player' and your place in the inner circle.Companies have long memories and know that even if you decide to stay, statistically you are almost certain to leave them again. You will always be suspected of being on a job interview whenever you are absent from work for any reason. The counter offer, therefore, is usually nothing more than a stalling device to keep you around until your employer can quietly find a replacement for you.Numerous studies have shown that the basic reasons for wanting to change jobs in the first place will nearly always resurface. Changes made as the result of a counter offer rarely last beyond the short-term. For very good reasons, well-managed companies usually do not make counter offers. They believe their policies are fair and equitable and will address any issues prior to a resignation, not afterwardsYour resignation letter Your goal should be to resign in a manner that discourages a counter offer from ever being made in the first place. This is accomplished by stating in unmistakable terms that your decision is final. A less direct approach is likely to leave the impression that what you are really doing is attempting to use your job offer to extract concessions.To eliminate any possible misunderstanding, always submit your resignation in writing. Your typewritten letter should be brief and should contain an unambiguous statement of resignation, an expression of thanks for the professional association you have enjoyed, a final date of employment, and a cooperative statement expressing your willingness to help during the transition period prior to your last day of work. The resignation meetingIf anything is said that even sounds like a lead into a counter offer, simply say, “I didn’t come here to force you into a bidding war. I simply have been presented with an opportunity I cannot pass up.” Then use the statement that should be the basis for the last line of your resignation letter: “Is there anything that I can do to help during the transition time before my last day?”During your resignation meeting, you should be prepared for a reaction, which could range from shock, disappointment, or they may congratulate you. Regardless of the company’s reaction, your plan is to remain calm and professional. It is imperative that you handle your part of the resignation meeting in a courteous and professional manner. The kind of character reference the company will give you in the future will be strongly influenced by the impression you left behind when you resigned. The final few daysRemember that co-workers will be curious about why you are leaving. Whether they corner you at work or call you at home, tell them exactly what you told the company. Anything you say will most likely get back to your employer and make the departure more difficult. Finally, do not underestimate the importance of your performance during your last two weeks. It is a serious mistake to become “mentally unemployed” and wind down while working out your notice. Give it your very best effort right up until the last minute you’re there. You will never be sorry you did.By using the strategies and techniques outlined above, you will resign with a high degree of professionalism and without burning any bridges behind you. Your plan is to remain calm, courteous and in control at all times - Good luck!

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Even the best of job opportunities have their downsides, and the decision to change jobs should never be made lightly.

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Thomas Wesseldine

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Thomas Wesseldine

Thomas Wesseldine

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Thomas Wesseldine

Analytical study: An exploration on how to recruit a Member of  Parliament
Analytical study: An exploration on how to recruit a Member of Parliament

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Financial Services

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Market Insight Reports

09/12/19

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On December 12th 2019, the British public are the hiring managers for 650 very important roles. The process for electing new Members of Parliament is never short of criticism and, we as recruitment experts, want to share how we would apply our experience and knowledge to source the right person for this crucial role. This report is an exploration of how we would use our bespoke methods to hire a new Member of Parliament on behalf of the British public. Whenever we engage with a client on a search mandate, we have a consulting session with the hiring manager and HR to put together a bespoke and robust process that, partnered with their needs and our experience, will lead to a successful hire. In this instance, the hiring manager is circa 52 million people, and so we reached out to our candidates and clients asking them to complete a questionnaire on what they would be looking for in their Member of Parliament. We had a great response to our survey, with 161 responses in 48 hours. Thank you to all who participated. From the results, and wider data research, we have put together a guide including an MP job description, the proposed interview process, and specific questioning lines to get the most out of our potential candidates. Of course, this report is a bit of fun, however from exploring the way in which the current system works and looking intrinsically at our own internal processes, we believe there are a number of questions we should be asking ourselves with regards to, not just December 12th, but in the context of hiring in general. It is clear that in any hiring process, honesty, integrity and accountability are up-held at all times, and this could not be more accurate than during a General Election. This General Election is one of the most polarising political events of our life-time with several very clear issues dominating the race so far, including Brexit and the NHS. In an attempt to avoid alienation - and as this is an exercise in process and procurement - we elected to steer clear of any policy based questions; instead focusing on experience and character, and the results threw up some surprises! Download the full report here   Your member of parliament

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This report is an exploration of how we would use our bespoke methods to hire a new Member of Parliament on behalf of the British public.

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Thomas Wesseldine

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Thomas Wesseldine

Thomas Wesseldine

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Thomas Wesseldine

Accountants 'engaged with social media'
Accountants 'engaged with social media'

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Finance & Accounting

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General

11/04/16

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Although it has been suggested in the past that professionals services workers such as accountants are lagging behind when it comes to the adoption of social media, a new report has cast doubt on this premise. The latest Wolters Kluwer Social Media Survey, which sampled the views of 1,100 accountants at the end of 2013, found 77 per cent of respondents to be utilising some form of social platform in their professional life. This is a small increase compared to 2012, but a jump of ten per cent from the survey carried out in 2011. Over a third of respondents visited social media sites at least once a day, while 27 per cent did so several times. One factor in this could be the growing popularity of smartphones and tablets - two-thirds of accountants had accessed Twitter or Facebook via their phone over the course of the year. CCH Software managing director Simon Crompton said: "Social media is now an established part of the business landscape. You may not use it extensively in either your private or professional lives - in fact you may not currently use it at all - but a lot of people do, including probably many clients and potential clients of accountants." Sites such as LinkedIn and Twitter are proving increasingly important in the B2B and B2C landscape, with some consumers perceiving social media as more trustworthy than traditional marketing channels. However, this depends to some extent on which platform is used - according to Wolters Kluwer, LinkedIn remains the most popular in the professional services sector, with over 13 million UK users. Some 67 per cent of social media users in accountancy admitted to using the platform as part of their professional life. On the other hand, only ten per cent of respondents ever made use of blogs, while Google+ - still a relatively new site - is ignored by 74 per cent of accountants.

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Although it has been suggested in the past that professionals services workers such as accountants are lagging behind when it comes to the adoption of social media, a new report has cast doubt on this premise.

Read full article
Thomas Wesseldine

by

Thomas Wesseldine

Thomas Wesseldine

by

Thomas Wesseldine