Employment Law Roundtable | Mental Health at Work

Hannah Spears our consultant managing the role

We hosted an Employment Law Roundtable on mental health at work at our offices in London. The participants were senior human resource practitioners from a range of businesses and sectors. The event was co-hosted by Seddons Solicitors and chaired by Helen Crossland, a Partner and Head of Employment Law at Seddons, who shared her professional expertise.

We decided to discuss this topic as the practitioners from Seddons had seen a noticeable increase in the number of mental health related cases from their clients in the last few years. We collectively believe that this increase is a positive sign of heightened awareness of mental health, representing an effort to remove the stigma and put mental health on the same platform as physical health.

The aim of this roundtable was to share insights and knowledge around dealing with physical and mental health at work. 
Specifically the conversation covered:

Statistics on mental health at work
How to manage mental health issues at work
Occupational Health referrals
The Equality Act 2010
Reasonable adjustments

03/05/19
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The past few months – and indeed, years – have demonstrated just how important diversity and inclusion are in modern society. Through the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements, a light has been shone on the inequality and injustice that persists, not just in our day to day lives, but also in the workplace. We can no longer ignore how important diversity and inclusion are to businesses, nor can we expect things to get better without actively working to improve conditions and outcomes for everyone. And while promoting diversity and inclusion is absolutely the right thing to do for employees, there are also business benefits to doing so.  What is diversity and inclusion? Diversity and inclusion aren’t just a priority for HR departments – it should be a key business strategy for all organisations. Workplace diversity can be defined as the understanding, acceptance and promotion of differences between people. 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Again, you can use specialised technology that can help you keep organised when interviewing multiple candidates. Because you are having a conversation in real-time, this two-way conversation allows you to understand the candidate better. Also, you have the chance to ask follow-up questions, which is a luxury you do not have in a one-way interview. Choose your room wisely When choosing which room you’ll conduct the video interview in, make sure it’s a quiet space with good lighting and consider using a backdrop. These are all small factors but they will help the meeting run smoothly and look professional – both of which will ensure the video interview has maximum impact. Depending on the video interview software you use, you may be able to select a neutral backdrop to virtually overlay your home setting. Do a test run 49% of businesses agree that video interviewing is a useful method to help them distinguish themselves from other employers. 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Marks Sattin is a specialist recruitment firm working with the best talent across banking, finance, executive search, technology and business change. And with over three decades of experience recruiting for these divisions, you can trust us to source the most suitable and talented candidates.

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