Senior Legal Counsel - Pensions

  1. Permanent
£90,000 - £120,000 per annum + 20% bonus
ADCLARA

London

The details

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Legal Counsel, General Commercial

Exciting Scale up in the Pensions space

Competitive Remuneration + Benefits

All-round commercial counsel form Private Practice or In-House

Top 20 Qualified

Confident self-starter, able to offer results based advice

About the business

An exciting scale up operating in the pensions market. This is an excellent opportunity for a commercially astute lawyer to join a trail blazing business. With vast growth plans, now is an excellent time to join this exciting scale-up. Offering a competitive remuneration package as well as high levels of autonomy and the opportunity to work closely with a 1st class leadership team.

About the Role

  • Supporting and providing the advice required by the boards and in interactions with investors.
  • Taking the lead on all NDA and data-sharing agreements, with support from the General Counsel and external law firms, as required.
  • Taking day to day responsibility for the negotiation of commercial contracts, with the support of the General Counsel and external law firms, as required.
  • Taking responsibility for preparation of 'formal' draft minutes of board meetings and committees, when required[1].
  • Taking responsibility for the Terms of Reference for all Committees, and attending meetings where applicable.
  • Initially, working alongside the General Counsel on negotiations and interactions with counterparties, including:
  • Establishment and maintenance of virtual data rooms.
  • Negotiations with counterparties and progression of legal documentation, with support from external law firms.
  • Disputes, if and when they arise, with support from external law firms.
  • Pensions law advice, with support from external law firms.

About You

  • Qualified solicitor; trained at a recognised leading law firm.
  • Excellent academic record.
  • 3 - 7 years PQE
  • High-quality experience at a recognised leading law firm and/or in an in-house environment
  • Experience of pensions law and transactions
  • Experience of risk transfer transactions and risk transfer market
  • Experience of data protection and related principles/compliance

Package

· Pension

· Performance based bonus up-to 20%

· Competitive salary

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