Thinking of taking recruitment in-house? Pros and cons of going it alone
Thinking of taking recruitment in-house? Pros and cons of going it alone

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HR

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General

15/09/20

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The economy has contracted in the wake of Covid-19, and so too have business budgets. We’ve seen a slowdown in recruitment activity around the world, with UK hiring halving in June 2020 compared to June 2019, and some organisations shedding staff or closing their doors entirely. Despite these trying times, however, we are also seeing many businesses emerge stronger from lockdown. Some industries are experiencing growth – the likes of pharma, e-commerce and digital communications are all thriving – and many organisations are now looking to the future. Part of this includes strengthening teams and adding value through the strategic hiring of A-player professionals.This raises an oft-asked question: Is in-house recruitment a better option than using a recruitment agency? With all eyes on budgets and the bottom line, some might argue that an in-house hiring process will save on cost – but does it deliver the same results, and how much is your internal team’s time worth? We’re exploring the pros and cons of in-house recruitment.Pro: It can seem more cost-effectiveWhen reducing budgets and trimming costs, the outsourced recruitment function can be the first thing to suffer. External expenditure on hiring is a cost some companies think they can no longer justify. Instead, some businesses take their recruitment in-house, relying on hiring managers, HR teams or dedicated in-house recruitment professionals to identify, attract and hire the right people. Aside from time, there are many hidden costs to recruiting inhouse that business leaders do not anticipate. " These can include: subscriptions to premium social media accounts, advertising on job boards and other platforms, recruitment software and having a presence at recruitment shows. If your business hires high volumes every year, then these costs may be justified, however this is limited by both the capacity and capability of your in-house team.Con: It can be extremely time-consumingNever underestimate the value of your team’s time. Specialist recruitment companies have vast networks of vetted candidates, both active and passive. They tend to be well-known in their fields, highly social and always making new connections. This means their potential candidate network usually far exceeds that of an in-house team, and they can contact pre-vetted candidates quickly. In-house teams can struggle to have this reach and impact and typically take longer to search for, vet and contact candidates.Within Marks Sattin, we’re seeing some companies choosing to take their recruitment in-house, only to get in touch down the line after realising how much time it takes to identify a quality shortlist of candidates. When you consider that one third of vacancies in the UK are considered hard to fill, it’s no surprise that teams often struggle when taking recruitment in-house. Writing and advertising vacancies, proactively headhunting and contacting passive candidates, responding to questions and applications and vetting CVs all takes an extraordinary amount of time – and that’s before you even start scheduling interviews. For in-house professionals who are also juggling other responsibilities, this can become too much and many businesses end up reverting back to an outsourced model.Pro: You can boost your employer brandingAn in-house function means you’ll own the end-to-end recruitment process and be solely responsible for the candidate experience. This presents a great opportunity to build your employer brand and take control of how you are perceived by potential employees.If you outsource your recruitment function to a specialist recruitment agency, you’ll be trusting them to represent your company appropriately and guarantee the best possible candidate experience. They will often act as the initial touch point and introduction to your role and company. This means a good recruitment agency will take the time to get a strong understanding of your company culture, requirements, role and business objectives.Con: You miss out on expert insightsIf you hire an in-house recruiter to your organisation, make sure they have a deep understanding of your industry and wider market trends. A good recruitment partner will not only understand what developments, opportunities and challenges are emerging in your industry – whether that’s a new technology making waves or new legislation creating qualification requirements – but also what the market is like for candidates and clients. Crucially, they need to know about the specific roles they are searching for.This is especially important for executive search, where passive candidates need extra incentives to change roles. Executive recruiters must understand their markets inside out, and know what will incentivise certain professionals to move, something which in-house teams may not always understand. In-house professionals usually recruit for roles across the whole business, whether that’s a marketing intern, CFO or diversity manager, and it can be challenging for them to get a deep understanding of each of these very different roles.Save time and get the best candidates with Marks SattinWe are proud to be recruitment specialist in our markets of financial services, commerce and industry, professional services, executive search, business change and technology. We have 32 years’ experience and pride ourselves on repeat business, excellent customer service and our candidate care, where we source, meet and screen every candidate ourselves. We build long-term relationships that allow us to understand your business and requirements, ultimately saving you time and money and delivering professionals we know will be successful. Register a vacancy with us to see how we can help you.

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Is in-house recruitment a better option than using a recruitment agency? With all eyes on budgets and the bottom line, some might argue that an in-house hiring process will save on cost – but does it deliver the same results, and how much is your internal team’s time worth? We’re exploring the pros and cons of in-house recruitment.

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Carmine Scalzo

by

Carmine Scalzo

Carmine Scalzo

by

Carmine Scalzo

Rethinking workspaces – how will your company adapt to the new normal?
Rethinking workspaces – how will your company adapt to the new normal?

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General

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General

01/09/20

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Akin to the tourism and travel industry, the commercial property market has undergone a real shake up over the past number of months. We have been speaking to many business leaders who are desperately trying to balance a host of decisions, such as social distancing, rental agreements and remote employee engagement. In order to answer some of these prevalent questions our Managing Director, Matthew Wilcox, hosted a discussion on these topics with flexible work space experts Instant Group. Instant Group place more than 11,000 companies in flexible work spaces annually around the world. The panel of experts included Matt Dawson - Strategic Sales Consultant, John Williams - Head of Marketing, and James Booth - CFO. They tackled the many uncertainties, below is a summary of short Q&A video snippets: Is the office dead?   What is remote working and what are the cost implications of not having a physical office? Motivating a remote workforce    What is the future role of the office?   Five predictions for the future of Corporate Real Estate We now have to question what is the purpose of the office? The new role of a Head of CRE (Commercial Real Estate)   The importance of office design to entice employees to visit   If you would like to contact us for more information on this webinar or general market trends, you can email us at marketing@markssattin.com. Alternatively, follow us on LinkedIn to stay up to date on business and recruitment trends.

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Akin to the tourism and travel industry, the commercial property market has undergone a real shake up over the past number of months.

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Alastair Paterson

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Alastair Paterson

Alastair Paterson

by

Alastair Paterson

Survey results: Business response to Covid-19
Survey results: Business response to Covid-19

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General

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General

31/08/20

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‘The only constant is change’ has never rang more true and there is no facet of business that has not been changed dramatically by this year’s global events. It is not about adjusting to any ‘new normal’, it’s about making sure you can adapt adequately to this new, more rapid pace of change'. During May 2020, we produced a survey for our contacts to understand how their business was reacting to the pandemic and to gauge overall market sentiment. We received over 130 responses to key questions relating to their thoughts, reactions and predictions regarding the unprecedented level of change we are experiencing. Although market conditions are changing daily, the ease of lock down has brought a wave of positivity as we look to rebuild on the disruption of the past few months. With this in mind, the below report outlines some of the findings from our research, and our predictions for the future. Covid-19 survey

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The only constant is change’ has never rang more true and there is no facet of business that has not been changed dramatically by this year’s global events. It is not about adjusting to any ‘new normal’

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David Harvey

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David Harvey

David Harvey

by

David Harvey

The business case for a robust diversity and inclusion strategy in your organisation
The business case for a robust diversity and inclusion strategy in your organisation

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HR

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General

05/08/20

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The past few months – and indeed, years – have demonstrated just how important diversity and inclusion are in modern society. Through the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements, a light has been shone on the inequality and injustice that persists, not just in our day to day lives, but also in the workplace. We can no longer ignore how important diversity and inclusion are to businesses, nor can we expect things to get better without actively working to improve conditions and outcomes for everyone. And while promoting diversity and inclusion is absolutely the right thing to do for employees, there are also business benefits to doing so.  What is diversity and inclusion? Diversity and inclusion aren’t just a priority for HR departments – it should be a key business strategy for all organisations. Workplace diversity can be defined as the understanding, acceptance and promotion of differences between people. This includes those of different genders, races, ages, sexual orientations, disabilities and religions, as well as people who have different educational, socioeconomic and experiential backgrounds. Meanwhile, inclusion is about creating a supportive and respectful work environment that values collaboration and participation of all employees, helping everyone to feel included. Together, diversity and inclusion make companies more welcoming, accessible and harmonious for everyone, not to mention more profitable and competitive. Why is diversity and inclusion important? First and foremost, diversity and inclusion are essential to make workplaces better for everyone. Purely from a compassionate perspective, it’s the right thing for employers to create environments where people feel comfortable to be themselves and can succeed without limitation. Commercially, diversity and inclusion have a significant number of benefits. Firstly, a strong focus on D&I can significantly widen the candidate talent pool , giving you access to more candidates who may be excluded by non-diverse hiring strategies. With 70% of job seekers looking for a company’s commitment to diversity when applying for new roles, it’s clear that you may be missing out on top talent if you neglect to address D&I in your organisation.  On top of that, diverse organisations have better business results, higher employee satisfaction and are more innovative, according to Business in the Community . McKinsey research shows that executive teams in the top quartile for gender diversity were 25% more likely to have above-average profitability than those companies who perform poorly in terms of executive-level gender diversity. This figure jumps to 36% when analysing teams with ethnic diversity. Diverse teams have also been proven to be more innovative, solve problems faster and have more engaged employees.  Small steps to move the dial on D&I in your organisation The current emphasis on working from home presents a key opportunity for employers to rethink their D&I hiring strategies, with current conditions potentially opening up more flexible, part-time opportunities for those who may not have otherwise been able to commit to a 9-5 office job. To welcome more working parents and caregivers, disabled people and those with neurodiversity requirements, consider whether vacancies could be flexible, remote working or on part-time hours. Now is the perfect time to rethink your workspace and how it can be made more accessible to more people.  A dedicated diversity and inclusion policy, taskforce or officer can help to highlight its importance within your business. You could perform a D&I audit, examining the levels of diversity that exist within the company and specifically at the executive level, and set goals to achieve a more balanced, inclusive environment within a certain time period. Have open conversations with your team members about D&I and ask them what would make them – and new team members – feel more welcomed. It’s also important to acknowledge the diversity that already exists in your company, such as by celebrating different cultural and religious events, greeting bilingual employees in their mother tongue or inviting families into work.  Finally, while diversity and inclusion should be championed at the very highest levels of your business, it’s crucial that every single team member feels safe to contribute to these discussions and voice their opinions and stories. Prepare to tackle some difficult topics and be questioned. While subjects like the gender pay gap, lack of executive-level diversity and opportunities for progression can feel difficult to address, they are important conversations that need to be had in the process of making real change.  Marks Sattin can help to diversify your talent pool. By partnering with a specialist recruitment agency which has a strong focus on diversity and inclusion , you’ll benefit from having access to more candidates and guidance on how to actively recruit from diverse talent pools. At Marks Sattin, we can help you identify, attract and retain exceptional people across financial services, technology, change management and more.  Contact us here to have a chat about how we can work together.  Content composed with the free online HTML editor toolkit. Please subscribe for a membership to stop adding links to the edited documents.

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The past few months – and indeed, years – have demonstrated just how important diversity and inclusion are in modern society.

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Becky Hughes

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Becky Hughes

Becky Hughes

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Becky Hughes

Engaging employees when working remotely
Engaging employees when working remotely

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General

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General

11/06/20

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According to Buffer’s 2019 State of Remote Work report, 99% of respondents admitted wanting to work remotely in the future. While that may have seemed like a distant reality for some, in what felt like an overnight transition, the majority of the workforce went from seeing their colleagues every day to communicating entirely online. Managers too had to adapt to this ‘new’ normal and familiarise themselves with hiring and onboarding remotely. In the first few weeks companies were caught up in the flurry of activity, but as things have started to settle, many employers are beginning to question what impact remote working will have on employee engagement. Most organisations have likely brought their daily stand up meetings into the virtual space but there’s much more that can be done. The following tips will help companies engage their remote employees by creating a positive working culture that not only works during the pandemic, but also in the post-coronavirus world. Create a distinction between home and work Buffer’s State of Remote Work report also shows that 22% of remote workers struggle with switching off from work, making it the top problem these employees face. Employers must help their team maintain good mental health by creating a separation between work and leisure time. Take inspiration from others: Good-Loop has offered each employee £50 to spend on their home office, inspiring them to create a space that helps them to concentrate. Meanwhile, advertising agency Merkle has sent out printable artwork for their employees to bring some life to their virtual background. This is also helpful for managers who want to conduct a video interview for maximum impact. Recognition According to O.C Tanner’s 2020 Global Culture Report, company leaders see an 83% boost in engagement when they recognise their employees. For recognition to be effective, leaders must ensure they celebrate those big achievements whilst also showing appreciation for the small wins. A learning culture Isaac Newton achieved some of his greatest mathematical breakthroughs whilst in quarantine and the modern-day workforce also has the opportunity to unlock their stores of creativity during times of limited social interaction. Virtual classrooms and content co-creation tools like online whiteboards are just two options for boosting workplace learning during Covid-19. Here are some other methods: Initiate a ‘learning from home’ hour Having employees block out a ‘learning from home’ hour in their calendar ensures they have the time to dedicate to improving their industry knowledge. This time can be spent taking a course, reading thought-leadership articles, or learning about anything that helps them feel more engaged in their work. Internal learning sessions Hosting internal learning sessions is a great way to encourage knowledge sharing within and across teams. Employers can either schedule fortnightly meetings where teams present insights from their ‘learning from home’ time or give employees the option to share thought-provoking ideas in the Friday wrap-up session.  Involve external thought leaders Invite external industry experts to bring a fresh perspective into the business, either through a presentation or by collaborating with them on a webinar. Working alongside a thought leader can spark innovative thinking, boost motivation and help employees feel more engaged in their field of work. Use surveys and questionnaires This is a dynamic way for organisations to engage their team because it empowers the employees to generate fresh ideas, mention pain points and state what helps them feel more involved in their work. This method receives bonus points because it saves companies the time of trialling and testing engagement practices that have worked for other organisations and skip right to applying practices that are personally suggested by their team. It’s important to remember that what works for one employee or team may not for the next. Employee engagement organisation, Effectory, began surveying employees since the outbreak of coronavirus to gain insight into the new working pattern and what it means for productivity and wellbeing. The results show that 66% of the workforce are able to do their job effectively from home and though this is a majority it still leaves one in three people struggling with the new working culture. Effectory have created a free Covid-19 Workforce Pulse survey which enables organisations to gain fast feedback on their employees’ engagement levels during the pandemic. The aggregated data from the survey shows that the top-performing companies all have one thing in common – they actively involve their employees. Use values to cultivate a sense of community Involving employees in the decision-making process through questionnaires also creates a sense of community. To nurture this environment, employers should seek more ways of helping their teams feel connected, something that’s particularly important for remote workers with limited social interaction. Emphasising the company values will ensure that employees working remotely feel as though they are marching to the beat of the same drum whilst encouraging camaraderie. To ensure their team feel connected and engaged, GitLab is hosting virtual coffee mornings. Boasting the world’s largest remote workforce, GitLab understands the importance of bringing colleagues together and promoting a shared sense of purpose. From e-birthday cards to online quizzes, there’s a lot that organisations can do to create a positive and inclusive virtual office culture. Are you looking for advice that’s relevant and timely? Since our advent in 1988, Marks Sattin have gained the expertise and knowledge that enables us to source the very best talent for businesses at every level, from start-ups to global organisations. Our recruitment consultants are committed to staying on top of trends in their specialist markets meaning they're able to provide our clients with the most relevant advice. Contact us to find out how we can help you recruit the top talent in your industry or register a vacancy now.

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According to Buffer’s 2019 State of Remote Work report, 99% of respondents admitted wanting to work remotely in the future.

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Matthew Fitzpatrick

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Matthew Fitzpatrick

Matthew Fitzpatrick

by

Matthew Fitzpatrick

How to conduct a video interview for maximum impact
How to conduct a video interview for maximum impact

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General

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General

28/04/20

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Historically, hiring managers have been uncertain about choosing video interviews over an in-person interview. However, the recent Covid-19 crisis has meant that much of the UK’s - and the world’s - recruitment activity has moved online, and there is no denying that video interviewing is an integral part of this. Virtual interviews allow HR professionals to remotely hire the best talent. There are many benefits to the video interview – it saves time, suits flexible working and - with permission - you can record the session and watch it back to help you make your decision. Consider that most hiring managers conduct three interviews per candidate, with some organisations like Google following multi-stage interview hiring featuring different people from across the business. Now imagine how much time you can save by running a virtual meeting. But the question remains - how do you conduct a video interview for maximum impact? You’ll need to begin by adapting your pre-interview preparation. Prior to the interviewOne-way or two-way interview Video interviews are one of our top tips for hiring and onboarding remotely , but first you must choose which style suits you best. One-way interviews don’t require you to interview the candidate in real time; instead you send the questions on and have them record their answers. You can either use specialised video interviewing software which will send out invites and do the recording for you, or have the candidate record and send it on themselves.  A major benefit of this video interview style is the added ease – you don’t need to find a time where both you and the candidate are available, and you can watch it at your convenience. It allows you to create a more consistent process but this comes at the cost of an impersonal format. A two-way video interview entirely mimics the traditional interview, but without both you and the candidate being in the same room. Again, you can use specialised technology that can help you keep organised when interviewing multiple candidates. Because you are having a conversation in real-time, this two-way conversation allows you to understand the candidate better. Also, you have the chance to ask follow-up questions, which is a luxury you do not have in a one-way interview. Choose your room wisely When choosing which room you’ll conduct the video interview in, make sure it’s a quiet space with good lighting and consider using a backdrop. These are all small factors but they will help the meeting run smoothly and look professional – both of which will ensure the video interview has maximum impact. Depending on the video interview software you use, you may be able to select a neutral backdrop to virtually overlay your home setting. Do a test run 49% of businesses agree that video interviewing is a useful method to help them distinguish themselves from other employers. But to stand out for the right reasons your technology needs to be up to scratch. Check your tech before the interview, testing everything from your microphone volume to your internet connection. A top tip is to use a headset as this will cut out background noise.  A noticeable time lag will make communication difficult and even uncomfortable in some cases so your connection must be high quality. Additionally, any technical glitch on the day will interrupt the flow of the interview which can leave the candidate, or you, feeling thrown off balance. Having your technology set up and running without complications is the best way of ensuring that your video interview has maximum impact.  During the interview Remember that a virtual interview should feel as professional and flow as seamlessly as an in-person interview. Seven in ten candidates will share a negative job experience online, which can hurt your future recruiting efforts, whether they happen online or not. So it’s vital that you consider how you can make sure your video interviews run as seamlessly as possible. Here are some quick tips: Have their CV to hand No matter if you’re recording the video interview or not, you’ll want to have a hard copy of the candidate’s CV in front of you. When conducting multiple interviews, it’s a common problem to forget which candidate said what. Save yourself the task of searching back through the video clips and make detailed annotations; this will leave you more time to search for new leads or screen candidates. Put them at ease Interviews are notoriously nerve-wracking and despite not being in the same room as you, the candidate may still feel tense. To see their true potential, you must make them feel comfortable. It’s recommended that for a video interview you only need to frame your face and shoulders in the camera shot, which means that you’re relying on your facial expressions to communicate your body language. Therefore, strong eye contact and an encouraging smile are paramount and will help put the interviewee at ease. Slow it down Even if you have the best technical set up and a great internet connection, picking up on social cues can be tricky in a video interview. To make sure that you don’t miss out on any signals, keep the pace of the interview slow. Relaxing the speed will also alleviate any nerves for the candidate and allow them time to collect their thoughts and showcase their abilities. After the interview Keep in touch Just as you would after an in-person interview, it's crucial to maintain contact with the candidate, or the recruiter you're working with on their behalf. If you don’t keep regular contact with prospective employees, this signals that you are not serious about hiring them and the candidates may pursue other options. Therefore, to maintain access to the best pool of candidates, you should make a point of communicating timelines clearly and updating throughout the recruitment process. Making an offer There’s no use in waiting around to give candidates your verdict. Speed is of the essence and if you manage the timing poorly you risk losing your top candidates to other employers. Once you’ve made your decision it’s time to let your latest recruit know the good news and reach out to the other interviewees to thank them for their time. In summary For years hiring managers and recruiters have weighed up the benefits of video interviewing against in-person interviews but in light of recent changes to our global workforce, no one can deny how essential the virtual meetings are to keep businesses moving along as usual.  Marks Sattin has been recruiting for over 30 years If you found this advice on conducting a video interview for maximum impact helpful then you can view more of our market insights here. Marks Sattin is a specialist recruitment firm working with the best talent across banking, finance, executive search, technology and business change. And with over three decades of experience recruiting for these divisions, you can trust us to source the most suitable and talented candidates.

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Historically, hiring managers have been uncertain about choosing video interviews over an in-person interview.

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Sophie Walker

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Sophie Walker

Sophie Walker

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Sophie Walker

Webinar: A Finance Director's guide to navigating the current challenges in a SME
Webinar: A Finance Director's guide to navigating the current challenges in a SME

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Executive Search

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General

20/04/20

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In an episode of our Gi Group Leadership Webinar Series, we welcomed Paul Goodman, a Finance Director with extensive experience in a number of sectors, and Alastair Paterson, Marks Sattin Director, to discuss the challenges finance leaders have been facing in these unprecedented times. The areas they touch on include: Strong financial leadership Survival mentality Planning for recovery External support Watch our webinar recording below, which particularly looks at what finance leaders need to focus on now, and indeed how current and past professional experience can provide learnings for the future.  

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Watch our webinar recording below, which particularly looks at what finance leaders need to focus on now, and indeed how current and past professional experience can provide learnings for the future.

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Alastair Paterson

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Alastair Paterson

Alastair Paterson

by

Alastair Paterson

Transitioning to Renewable Energy
Transitioning to Renewable Energy

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Investment and Advisory

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General

01/04/20

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We hosted a roundtable in London, attended by a group of senior professionals from investment banks, private equity funds and energy companies. The aim was to discuss topics that are currently impacting their profession, and share experiences and insights. We have summarised this conversation in an easy to read whitepaper, covering the following: About “Net Zero”Barriers to transitionThe political dimensionPropellants of transitionFuture prospects Transitioning to Renewable Energy

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We hosted a roundtable in London, attended by a group of senior professionals from investment banks, private equity funds and energy companies.

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Michael Ivory

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Michael Ivory

Michael Ivory

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Michael Ivory

10 tips on remote hiring and onboarding during COVID-19
10 tips on remote hiring and onboarding during COVID-19

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General

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General

31/03/20

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With the vast majority of professionals currently and indefinitely working from home, we are all living through the dramatic effect COVID-19 is having on our society. As some industries like travel and hospitality grind to a complete halt; others such as FMCG, medical devices, pharmaceuticals and logistics, are experiencing extreme levels of demand.  Hiring for essential positions simply cannot stop because of the new remote working arrangements across the globe. This requires businesses to get creative with their recruitment and onboarding processes.  Here are 10 tips for recruiting and onboarding remotely   1. Virtual interviews Interview candidates using one of the many video conferencing applications out there such as Skype, Zoom or WebEx. These are often easier and more efficient than face to face interviews, as you can follow the same or similar format you would use in a face to face interview, with the added benefit of saving time.  2. Shorten the recruitment process, including interview stages  Try to keep the stages in the recruitment process to a minimum and decision making quick – top talent with essential skills in key worker industries are in high demand; if you have long recruitment processes, you are more than likely going to lose the candidate to another business.  3. Make HR paperwork digital Move away from printing and posting signed contracts, which can be time consuming and often impossible in a remote working environment. Use an e-signing tool such as DocuSign or HelloSign so that employees can sign digitally and quickly share contracts with you in a secure environment.  4. Help your new employee to get started with the right tech Arrange for any hardware to be delivered, or software to be remotely installed on their devices via your IT department before their scheduled start date. Have IT and the line manager help them set up what they may need, including: work-related software, tools required by your IT department (antivirus, password managers etc.), team collaboration platforms (chat, file sharing etc.). Also make sure their webcam, microphone and sound-card work for video conferencing capability.  5. Communicate company culture As it is more difficult for new employees to absorb the company’s work culture remotely, it is important to be proactive and introduce them to the company’s values and culture early on. A good remote introduction to the business should include: a breakdown of the company values, a high level description of the company (history, milestones, mission statement, business goals etc.), and a code of conduct (regarding commitment, inclusiveness, communication etc.). Share any employee literature that’s available, such as an employee handbook, company presentations etc.   6. New team and key stakeholder introductions A vital part of the remote onboarding process is to integrate the new employee into the team and business, and have them feel comfortable and welcome. One-on-one and/or group video or conference calls would be a good way to make these introductions. Ongoing communication is key, such as monthly budget meetings, team meetings, weekly catch-ups with the line manager etc. Having a closer relationship with someone inside the company from the start will ease the new employee’s anxiety and increase their engagement. 7. Arrange IT & role specific training To effectively train remote workers, use interactive training courses where possible. Utilise screen sharing tools such as Skype or Join.Me. Engage relevant trainers and buddies such as IT staff, line managers, subject matter experts, and ensure regular follow-ups are made.   8. Help your new employee to communicate easily and effectively  Describe the best ways to contact team members and how to troubleshoot communication technology, such as company email, group messaging tool, video conferencing tool, web phone application etc. Different team members may like to communicate in different ways. It would also be worth having a conversation on what content is appropriate and not appropriate to share via the different mediums. 9. Set specific goals and expectations  Remote workers should not wait until their manager is online to learn what their next tasks are. Make sure hiring managers develop and share a task calendar with their teams; define short and long-term goals and expectations; schedule weekly one-on-one meetings to discuss projects, or how they can help to resolve potential issues. 10. Continuously answer their questions and keep communication lines open New hires are usually anxious about their role and responsibilities. This is exacerbated for remote employees, who have the added disadvantage of needing to figure out many procedures and best practices on their own. When onboarding remote employees, you should aim to put them at ease by answering questions that many new hires are afraid to ask, (e.g. regarding vacation policies, bonuses, reimbursement procedures etc.). Leave some time towards the end of your onboarding program to gather feedback from your remote worker, and have team leaders do a Q&A session with them. Coronavirus is undoubtedly impacting the way we do businesses right now. While we navigate the changes and take precautions - leveraging technology, making prompt decisions and onboarding effectively can help you maintain some of your best practices and achieve already stretched business requirements.  If you would like more advice on remote hiring, or on the hiring market in Leeds in general, please do get in touch on leeds@markssattin.com. Cited: https://www.cio.com/article/3532458/how-to-keep-hiring-and-onboarding-new-talent-while-working-remotely.html  https://www.hiringthing.com/how-to-onboard-remote-employees/ https://resources.workable.com/remote-employees-onboarding-checklist https://elearningindustry.com/how-to-remote-staff-onboarding https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/17/careers-tips-for-successful-remote-job-interviews-amid-coronavirus.html   

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While we navigate the changes and take precautions - leveraging technology, making prompt decisions and onboarding effectively can help you maintain some of your best practices and achieve already stretched business requirements.

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Stephanie Teale

by

Stephanie Teale

Stephanie Teale

by

Stephanie Teale