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Tax

Our team has over 20 years of experience recruiting within the tax community, from part qualified to director level across all sectors. We partner with businesses from small boutiques to the FTSE 100, across the UK and Ireland, and offer genuine subject-matter expertise within corporate tax, VAT/indirect tax, employment tax, tax technology, R&D tax and international tax (including transfer pricing).

We have an outstanding relationship with the Big Four, mid-tier and independent tax practices. Our retained assignments ensure the confidentiality of roles against our competitors, enabling us to match our clients’ requirements and offer candidates the best opportunities.

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Related jobs

Corporate Tax Assistant Manager/Manager

Salary:

£35,000 - £45,000 per annum

Location:

Birmingham, West Midlands

Market

Professional Services

Job Discipline

Tax

Industry

Private Equity

Salary

£40,000 - £50,000

Qualification

Finalist / Newly qualified

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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We are currently recruiting for a Corporate Tax Assistant Manager/Manager for a global leading accountancy firm based in Birmingham City Centre.

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IM2401_1600945473

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22/10/20

Imran Miah

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Imran Miah
Imran Miah

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Imran Miah
Find out more
Corporate Tax Manager (OMB)

Salary:

£45,000 - £48,000 per annum

Location:

Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Market

Professional Services

Job Discipline

Tax

Industry

Professional Services

Salary

£40,000 - £50,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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A great opportunity for a Qualified Corporate Tax to work with some major clients in a thriving Top Tier accountancy practice.

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BBBH161463_1600875241

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21/10/20

Imran Miah

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Imran Miah
Imran Miah

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Imran Miah
Find out more
Tax Manager | In-house Banking Sector

Salary:

Negotiable

Location:

City of London, London

Market

Financial Services

Job Discipline

Tax

Industry

Investment Banking & Capital Markets

Salary

£80,000 - £100,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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Marks Sattin are proud to be working with a large international Bank who are looking for a Corporate Tax Manager to join their team.

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NH4_1599821476

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18/09/20

Nicholas Hesketh

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Nicholas Hesketh
Nicholas Hesketh

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Nicholas Hesketh
Find out more
International Tax Advisor: In-house role

Salary:

£55,000 - £60,000 per annum

Location:

London

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Tax

Industry

Technology

Salary

£60,000 - £70,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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Fast paced PE backed technology business are looking for a corporate tax specialist to join the team in a newly-created position due to growth.

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MS161070_1600103435

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12/10/20

Sophie Walker

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Sophie Walker
Sophie Walker

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Sophie Walker
Find out more
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Related articles

The tax and audit see-saw
The tax and audit see-saw

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Professional Services

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General

14/10/16

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It’s often said that recruitment firms are the barometer of the marketplace as political and economic uncertainty have an immediate effect on hiring levels and it’s clear that the market is tough, both in terms of roles released and decisions being made.  So perhaps it’s strange that September was our best month of the year and just shy of our all time record with strong results across our divisions and regions. Or not so strange. Whilst some of our competition talk openly about reducing their UK headcount, our strategy is to continue investing in our core markets and making key hires into our business. Even more crucially, our consultants prove again and again that their motivation, market knowledge and passion for the job are second to none.  Similarly, Professional Services performed strongly with audit hires driven primarily by strong levels of demand from mid-tier firms and the Big 4 being relatively quiet. The opposite is the case for tax, with Big 4 and Top 10 firms still hiring strongly. We’re also seeing increasing demand for specialists in tax automation and tech with firms keen to bolster their advisory offering as this area rapidly evolves. Writing for the Accountancy Age, Martin Muirhead, senior partner at Kingston Smith. notes that “larger firms have been able to grow their tax income at a faster rate than their fees from audit and accounting, with seven of the top ten firms reporting more growth in tax than audit. This trend does not appear to be replicated across the rest of the 50+50, with less than a third of firms across the top 100 being able to report the same.” Martin goes on to point out that the HMRC’s ‘Making Tax Digital’ scheme is likely to see a rise in advisory fees but squeeze compliance as tax returns become automated. One thing is certain as a turbulent 2016 draws to a close, the ever increasing complexity in regulation and compliance means that there is plenty to keep accountants occupied for some time to come.   

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It’s often said that recruitment firms are the barometer of the marketplace as political and economic uncertainty have an immediate effect on hiring levels and it’s clear that the market is tough, both in terms of roles released and decisions being made.

Read full article
Josh Rufus

by

Josh Rufus

Josh Rufus

by

Josh Rufus

Brexit could mean Britain takes a bite of #Appletax
Brexit could mean Britain takes a bite of #Appletax

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Professional Services

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General

08/09/16

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The European Competition Commission has ruled that “Ireland granted illegal tax benefits to Apple” leaving the company facing an eye-watering €13 billion (£11.1 billion) tax bill.  This selective tax treatment is considered illegal as it provides Apple a significant advantage over businesses that are subject to the same national taxation rules. Ireland must now recover the unpaid taxes in Ireland from Apple for the years 2003 to 2014. Plus interest.  In fact, the tax treatment in Ireland enabled Apple to avoid taxation on almost all profits generated by sales of Apple products in the entire EU Single Market. This is due to Apple's decision to record all sales in Ireland rather than in the countries where the products were sold.  Tax is complicated particularly in the modern, globalised economy so understanding Apple’s tax structure in Europe may shed some light on the Commission’s decision.  Apple Inc, in the US, is the top brass, the Big Kahuna. Apple Inc owns two smaller companies based in Ireland - Apple Sales International (ASI) and Apple Operations Europe.  These Irish companies hold the rights to use Apple's IP to sell Apple products outside America under a 'cost-sharing agreement'. They make yearly payments to Apple Inc to fund research and development efforts conducted on their behalf. In 2011 these payments amounted to about $2 billion and significantly increased in 2014. These payments are deducted from the profits recorded by these two companies in Ireland each year, in line with applicable rules. So far, so good. ASI is responsible for buying Apple products from manufacturers and selling these products in Europe, Middle East, Africa and India. Customers don’t buy their products from the shops that physically sell them, rather from ASI itself. In this way Apple recorded all sales, and the profits stemming from these sales, directly in Ireland. And this is where it gets interesting… Two rulings by the Irish tax authorities, in 1991 and 2007, endorsed an allocation of profits away from Ireland to a “head office” within ASI, and this "head office" was not based in any country and did not have any employees or own premises. Its activities consisted solely of occasional board meetings (a nice example of transfer pricing). Therefore, only a small percentage of ASI’s profits were taxed in Ireland. In 2011, ASI recorded profits of $22 billion with only approximately €50 million considered taxable in Ireland, leaving nearly €16 billion of profits untaxed. As a result, ASI paid less than €10 million of corporation tax in Ireland in 2011. In subsequent years, ASI’s recorded profits continued to increase but the profits considered taxable in Ireland under the terms of the tax rulings did not.  Apple’s response has been unequivocal with CEO, Tim Cook, insisting that the company is “not a tax dodger” and declaring that the Commission’s decision is “an effort to rewrite Apple’s history in Europe, ignore Ireland’s tax laws and upend the international tax system in the process" which will ultimately “have a profound and harmful effect on investment and job creation in Europe.” Cook’s indictment may well prove poignant as it’s been rumoured that Britain could be the big winner from this particular tax feud. Indeed this ruling is the conclusion of a two-year investigation and following landmark cases against Starbucks and Fiat and probes into Google and Facebook/ A so-called hard Brexit for Britain, going it alone and not remaining a part of the single market, would mean state aid rules would no longer constrain UK tax policy. A more favourable rate could be implemented regardless of the terms of negotiating Brexit as tax regimes are set at member state level (despite proposals for a Common Consolidate Corporate Tax Base that have been tabled since 2011). This would mean that the UK could position itself as a more attractive destination than Ireland, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, where the majority of the biggest US tech companies are headquartered, away from the growing stranglehold of state aid laws and EU Commission, which both the Irish government and the US Treasury have accused of trying to influence tax policy. Regardless, in today’s increasing global economy, the practice of taxing profits earned in one country but reporting them in tax havens through the use of contrived corporate structures seems obsolete - surely reform and massive simplification of global tax bases is the only viable solution for the future.

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Tax is complicated particularly in the modern, globalised economy so understanding Apple’s tax structure in Europe may shed some light on the Commission’s decision.

Read full article
Aaron Dhillon

by

Aaron Dhillon

Aaron Dhillon

by

Aaron Dhillon

HMRC has managed to greatly increase its tax take from wealthy UK individuals.
HMRC has managed to greatly increase its tax take from wealthy UK individuals.

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Professional Services

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General

11/04/16

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HM Revenue and Customs has claimed success in a new drive to recover unpaid tax, a new report has revealed. Written by legal firm Pinsent Masons, it showed the tax authorities managed to recover 60 per cent more revenue from what are described as "mass affluent" people. The affluent unit at HMRC covers those with incomes of more than £150,000 a year or wealth over £1 million and it managed to raise £137.2 million from this group last year, compared with only £85.7 million in 2013. Around half a million Britons fall under its remit and the unit has been greatly expanded under the current government, with manpower doubled in 2013 as another 100 tax inspectors were taken on. Pinsent Mason's head of litigation and compliance James Bullock said: "This surge in extra revenue from Affluent Unit tax investigations serves as a reminder that HMRC is widening its lines of inquiry. "People who would just consider themselves moderately successful professionals and business people are now also coming under the scrutiny of HMRC's specialist units." The success in raising more tax has clearly arisen from "a much more aggressive approach to prosecutions targeted at professionals and entrepreneurs", he concluded. However, critics may contend that yet more can be done and argue for more recruitment of tax experts in order to make further inroads into non-payment and bring in yet more revenue. Indeed, there may be pressure on politicians to pledge such measures in the run-up to May's general election. There have certainly been some very high-profile cases of wealthy individuals coming under scrutiny for tax evasion in recent years, such as comedian Jimmy Carr and singer Gary Barlow. However, much of the focus could also be on the tax bills of multinationals that have used all kinds of ingenious devices to avoid paying corporation tax. Tech firms are particularly notable for this, a point noted by Bank of England governor Mark Carney. He told a BBC-hosted event at the World Economic Forum in Davos last week that the tax bills of such firms are "very small relative to the returns".

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HM Revenue and Customs has claimed success in a new drive to recover unpaid tax, a new report has revealed.

Read full article
Aaron Dhillon

by

Aaron Dhillon

Aaron Dhillon

by

Aaron Dhillon