Cyber Security Engineer - London

  1. Permanent
Negotiable
BBBH160166_1600784480

City of London, London

The details

Cyber Security Engineer - London - £70k

A global professional services firm is looking to hire a Cyber Security professional on a permanent basis to be based initially remotely and then at its prestigious central London headquarters.

Responsibilities

  • Lead security detection and incident response activities including major incidents
  • Act as the Cyber Security escalation point
  • Analyse and identify trends from incidents, audit findings and any other applicable sources
  • Ensure timely and effective management of security incidents, identifying root cause and follow up actions to avoid recurrence
  • Working directly with the outsourced Security Operation Centre (SOC) to ensure all identified incidents are managed to a satisfactory conclusion
  • Working directly with the in-house IT security team to ensure all identified incidents are managed to satisfactory conclusion

Experience

  • Proven experience in cyber security incident triage, containment, remediation and recovery steps, ideally in a SOC environment
  • Background in taking the lead in Incident Response activities
  • Ability to handle high pressure situations in a productive and professional manner
  • A proficiency in using SIEM and security products to address cyber incidents

This is an exciting new role so please send your CV to Michael Moretti for immediate consideration


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