Technical Business Analyst

  1. Permanent
Negotiable
BBBH163973

Dublin

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Technical Business Analyst


Dublin, Ireland
Marks Sattin are delighted to be supporting a key client through a significant period of growth where they are aiming to be a technology disrupter within the Fintech space. We are currently assisting with the recruitment of a Technical Business Analyst for a permanent position located in Dublin. This is an exciting opportunity for an individual who is keen to take the next step in their career within a growing and innovative company.

The Opportunity:
This position will sit within the development team working on large scale development projects that improve products and services for the Fintech market. The role will involve working directly with senior stakeholders including the CTO and System Architect to gather and document requirements and collaborate with the development team and the stakeholders to design the best solution.
We are looking for someone who can be creative while using sound judgment and effective decision making. The right person should be curious, comfortable asking "why" and committed to learning all they can about our customers so they can deliver engaging and fulfilling user experiences. They should be enthusiastic about process improvement and continually improving their skills.

Skills and Experience
The right person should have the following skills and experience:

  • 5+ years' experience working as a Business Analyst on small-medium teams through the full software development lifecycle using a variety of methodologies (Scrum, Waterfall, Kanban).
  • Experience in IT design and a broad understanding of application, information and infrastructure design and best practices.
  • Experienced working with products that are underpinned by external data providers.
  • Strong experience with API products and testing tools.
  • Experience in writing detailed acceptance criteria/requirements for APIs, Web Services, and front-end user interfaces.
  • Experience in consuming a high-level concept and drill down to both functional and non-functional requirements that are actionable.
  • Be able to produce high quality requirements and designs, both technical and functional.
  • Experience with business process and systems workflow documentation.
  • Be an excellent communicator, able to get their point across, listen effectively to others and help the team communicate effectively.
  • Ability to manage relationship with Product Owners, both technical and non-technical, to define scope, issues, success criteria and requirements.
  • Comfortable working with technical teams.
  • Experience facilitating workshops and meetings.
  • Experience with JIRA and Confluence a plus.
  • Experience of software testing and an understanding of the quality assurance a plus.
  • Broad knowledge of SQL a plus.
  • Understand of analytics a plus.
  • Scrum master certification a plus.
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