Finance Manager

€30000 - €40000 per annum
ASS16900500

Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Aix-en-Provence

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ENGLISH/FRENCH SPEAKING TRANSACTIONAL FINANCE MANAGER - BASED IN AIX-EN-PROVENCE, FRANCE

Brand new and exciting opportunity for a bilingual English/French speaking Finance Manager to join a world class team which is part of an International success story.

As part of a high-growth, high change environment, you'll be really proven in all areas of managing a transactional finance team, and will be a subject matter expert in all things Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Cash/Treasury and expense management. With a real focus towards process/continous improvement, you'll have experience of takinga business from recent acquistion, and guide through all areas of transition, knowledge transfer, and systems implementation.

You'll be keen to work as part of a leadership team and will be building key stakeholder relationships with internal customers across Europe and Asia Pac. This is a really varied and ever-developoing role, and will definitely suit someone who can handle BAU as well as being part of a business critical project finance team.

Delivery and 'best in class' will be at the core of all you do in this role and your bilingual ability will be of paramount importance in communicating and influencing across the business.

If you feel that this role could suit you, then please send your details, and contact me for further information.

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