Solutions Architect - Professional Services

  1. Permanent
£80,000 - £85,000 per annum
BBBH160669_1600773032

City of London, London

The details


Solutions Architect - Professional Services


A leading global firm within the professional services space is looking to hire a Solutions Architect to be based remotely initially and then within its central London office.


The main remit of the role will be to design and lead the implementation of a solutions architecture across a group of specific business applications and technologies, by working with internal and external stakeholders and vendors.

Responsibilities

  • Provide guidance, governance and design for strategic technology areas.
  • Provide consulting support to application architects within projects to ensure the project is aligned with the overall enterprise architecture.
  • Monitor the current-state solution portfolio to identify deficiencies through aging of the technologies used by the application, or misalignment with business requirements.
  • Design and direct the governance activities associated with ensuring solutions architecture assurance and compliance.
  • Facilitate the evaluation and selection of software product standards and services, as well as the design of standard and custom software configurations.
  • Ensure that IT Architecture team members are active participants in teams formed to progress projects, business initiatives/aims etc.


Skills & Qualifications

  • Proven experience of working as a Solutions Architect delivering successful migration/greenfield projects.
  • Proficient in designing, building and deploying infrastructure services at a complex level
  • Experience in infrastructure services design, strategy and architecture related activities - preferably professionally certified for an enterprise system
  • Demonstrated ability in technology partner management practices including the ability to lead vendors/partners in defining architectures
  • Experience of working within professional services / legal / financial services would be advantageous but not essential


This is an excellent opportunity to work with an exciting and fast-moving environment so please send your CV to Michael Moretti for immediate consideration.

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