Cloud Architect

  1. Permanent
£80,000 - £85,000 per annum
BBBH24751_1600791534

City of London, London

The details

Cloud / Azure Architect - London

A top tier professional services firm is looking to hire an Azure Architect to join its growing Architecture Centre of Excellence based in central London.

The Azure Architect's main remit is to propose technically feasible solutions and input into future Azure cloud architecture roadmaps.

Responsibilities

  • Define and write standards
  • Work closely with key stakeholders to implement ICT projects in agreed timescales, financial budgets and solution quality metrics
  • Establish success criteria and act as the single point of contact for the stakeholders for all technical issues and technical deliverables during the solution implementation & integration
  • Use appropriate project management methodologies tailored to deliver cloud solutions as per key stakeholder requirements.
  • Play an active role in participating in any workshops or participating in any Technical Change Advisory Boards (TCAB)
  • Ensure that the journey to the cloud based services is as smooth as possible from a user's point-of-view and that any on premise services are still accessible

Skills & Experience

  • Technical skills in Azure Cloud Solutions
  • Able to define and write standards
  • Ability to present information and complex data to lay internal and external parties in a clear and understandable manner
  • Ability to develop and sustain key stakeholder relationships including between solution architects, application developers, external suppliers, and internal governance teams
jobs

Related jobs

Finance Director

Salary:

£90,000 - £105,000 per annum

Location:

Manchester, Greater Manchester

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Qualified Finance

Industry

Private Equity

Salary

£100,000 - £125,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Finance Director required by my client a PE backed organisation who are about to enter into their next exciting phase of international growth

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

BBBH161967

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

30/10/20

Becky Hughes

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Becky Hughes
Becky Hughes

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Becky Hughes
Find out more
IT Audit Senior Manager

Salary:

£80,000 - £90,000 per annum

Location:

London

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

IT Audit

Industry

Professional Services

Salary

£80,000 - £100,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Leading firm is looking for a qualified IT Audit Senior Manager (ACA/CISA equivalent) to join their team in Central London.

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

IT161966CBY

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

30/10/20

Charlie Buddery

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Charlie Buddery
Charlie Buddery

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Charlie Buddery
Find out more
Senior Investment Manager

Salary:

£120,000 - £135,000 per annum + 100% Bonus, Benefits.

Location:

Dublin

Market

Financial Services

Job Discipline

Investment - Buyside

Quantative

Industry

Investment Banking & Capital Markets

Investment Management

Salary

£125,000 - £175,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Our client is a Boutique Asset Manager with operations in Dublin, London, Hong Kong and New York.

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

BBBH161680

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

20/11/20

Matthew Fitzpatrick

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Matthew Fitzpatrick
Matthew Fitzpatrick

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Matthew Fitzpatrick
Find out more
View all jobs
posts

Related articles

The cost of the status quo | A contribution from Women in Fund Finance
The cost of the status quo | A contribution from Women in Fund Finance

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

HR

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

16/09/19

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

How failing to recruit and retain a diverse workforce may lose you the next big mandate, a contribution from Chelsea Bruno and Meera Savjani on behalf of Women in Fund Finance. Although hard to believe, there are still some who do not understand the value of diversity. Despite countless studies providing strong evidence that the most successful companies are those that employ a diverse group of individuals, many maintain homogenous workforces with no intention of diversifying. Although this approach has long gone unchallenged, there is now a growing consciousness within many corporate cultures which is driving companies to hold their external counter parts and service providers accountable for failing to address the issue. It comes as no surprise that some of the more “traditional” industries such as law and finance have been slower to progress in building diverse talent pools, and the clients of these firms have started to notice. In January 2019, more than 170 general counsels and corporate legal officers in the United States signed an open letter to big law firms which criticised these firms for the lack of diversity at the partner level. The letter, which was signed by companies such as Heineken, Vox Media, and S&P Global Ratings, stated that going forward these companies (many of which operate globally) would prioritise their legal spend on those firms that commit to diversity and inclusion. The letter went on to state “we applaud those firms that have worked hard to hire, retain and promote to partnership outstanding and highly accomplished lawyers who are diverse in race, colour, age, gender orientation, sexual orientation, national origin, and religion and without regard to disabilities”1. Although the letter does not set out how these firms plan to measure such level of commitment, it’s clear that these firms are serious about holding their legal counterparts accountable, and when taking a closer look, it’s clear that emphasis on diversity does not stop at these 170 corporations. Across the Atlantic, industry groups in the UK are also pushing to hold big corporates accountable for failing to make meaningful progress when it comes to diversity. As reported by the Guardian in May 2019, the Investment Association (IA), a trade body which represents UK investment managers who in aggregate manage over £7.7tn in AUM, has confronted 94 publicly listed companies for failing to make sufficient progress on gender diversity. The IA has written to each of these companies and raised concerns about the lack of gender diversity in leadership positions. A list of companies which received the highest level of warning from the IA was recently published in the Guardian and confirmed by IA2 , and although some of these companies have responded with statements emphasising efforts to address such issues, it’s clear that shareholders and potential investors will be looking for measurable progress going forward. In line with such expectations, some investors are taking accountability into their own hands, as evidenced by a change implemented by ILPA (the Institutional Limited Partner Association), the global industry body that represents the interest of private equity limited partners. ILPA recently expanded its standard due diligence questionnaire (DDQ) to include a section related to diversity and inclusion, and requires firms fill in a template which aims to measure and report the gender and ethnic diversity of teams by seniority and role. It also includes a section of questions designed to help investors understand a firm’s policies and procedures in areas such as hiring, promotions, family leave, mentoring, and harassment and discrimination. When asked about the updated DDQ, CEO of ILPA Steve Nelson stated “ILPA believes that diversity and inclusion is a strength that all stakeholders within the private equity ecosystem should embrace and promote in meaningful ways,” said Nelson. “The due diligence questionnaire expansion and Code of Conduct guidance represent an opportunity for general partners (GPs) and limited partners (LPs) to have conversations about these important issues, in the spirit of a stronger and ever improving workplace for everyone. We look forward to advancing these ideals which serve as the foundation for a healthy, prosperous industry.”3 As with the other industry groups discussed herein, ILPA is sending a clear message that diversity is no longer an optional. Changes such as the updated DDQ make it increasingly difficult for firms to completely ignore the topic, and although the potential consequences are meaningful in all industries, the cyclicality of fundraising in private equity means the risk associated with failing to adapt could be both severe and expensive. While few would doubt that the conversation around diversity and inclusion has evolved significantly over the past two decades, many are now suggesting that the time has come for the conversation to expand into action. Although just a few examples are discussed herein, it's almost for certain that there will be more letters and questionnaires to come. With the rise of such accountability, the cost of failing to adapt may soon weigh heavy on firms and maintaining the status quo of a homogenous workforce may come to feel like a burden in itself. Thus, firms must ask themselves whether the status quo is worth the missed opportunity that will result. The 10th edition of our highly regarded Market Insight Report represents the views of over 1,100 professionals, and contains insights from our specialist consultants and key business partners on market and employment trends.  If you’re looking to find out more on salary benchmarking and the motivations driving the modern workforce today, download our full report which contains key contributions from Western Union Business Solutions,Seddons Solicitors, Intoo UK & Ireland  and Breaking the Silence. Cited https://www.law.com/americanlawyer/2019/01/27/170-gcs-pen-open-letter-to-law-firms-improve-on-diversity-or-lose-our-business/ https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/may/13/investor-group-warns-almost-100-firms-over-lack-of-gender-diversity https://www.pr-inside.com/ilpa-publishes-diversity-and-inclusion-resources-f-r4704476.htm

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Although hard to believe, there are still some who do not understand the value of diversity.

Read full article
Mellani Georgiou

by

Mellani Georgiou

Mellani Georgiou

by

Mellani Georgiou

Will IR35 affect your business?
Will IR35 affect your business?

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

General

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

20/06/19

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

Employees in the United Kingdom can be categorised as full-time, part-time, casual, freelance and contract workers, with the self-employed bracket now making up 15% of the entire working population. The number of self-employed workers jumped from 3.3 million in 2001 to 4.8 million in 2017, with a corresponding fall in the unemployment rate showing the overall boost in jobs growth from the rise in self-employment. However, the attractive market for freelancers and contractors has been hit with some uncertainty in recent times, thanks largely to the 2018 Autumn Budget’s announcement of IR35 tax reforms. Here’s what the new IR35 rules could mean for you and your business: What is IR35? IR35 is a piece of legislation originally introduced to the UK in 1999. Its purpose is to differentiate between those workers who operate as genuine contractors and those who work as ‘disguised’ employees to avoid paying tax. It came about to challenge contractors who were taking advantage of the tax efficiencies of working through a limited company, with the aim of defending both the Exchequer from lost taxes and protecting workers’ rights from unscrupulous employees. However, the IR35 has proven to be ambiguous for many, with some contractors taking advantage of loopholes and a lack of clarity. Hence, the new IR35 rules aim to tighten up the contractor market and ensure tax avoidance loopholes are closed. How does IR35 work? There are three principles that can help to determine employment status and whether a contractor falls inside or outside IR35: Control (the degree of control the client has over the work a contractor does and how and when they do it) Substitution (whether the worker needs to do the work themselves or if they could send a substitute in their place) Mutuality of obligation (whether the employer is obliged to offer work and the contractor is obliged to accept it). Additionally, the contract type, provision of equipment and whether a worker is “part and parcel” of a business can all help to determine whether someone falls inside or outside IR35. The change in IR35 rules shifts the responsibility to determine tax status away from the contractor and onto the business that takes them on. Until now, contractors have been able to self-determine their status, however as of April 2020, when the new rules come into effect for the private sector, companies will risk being fined if they don’t make the correct assessment.  How will IR35 impact contract workers? It’s anticipated that many contract workers who have been enjoying the tax benefits of working outside IR35 will fall under the legislation when employers are tasked with determining their status. This will see more contractors having tax and National Insurance contributions deducted from their pay. However, if you operate as a legitimate small business and are determined to work outside of IR35, you will not be affected by the rule changes. How will IR35 impact employers? The major change for businesses is that they will now be responsible for determining the IR35 status of any contractor working for the company. The new rules will only apply to medium and large sized businesses, so contractors who work for small businesses can continue to set their own IR35 statuses. Those businesses that the IR35 rule changes do apply to will face paying back taxes and fines should they be found to be noncompliant. What should I do to prepare for IR35? Contractors may wish to speak to an accountant or personal finance expert to determine whether IR35 will impact them and if a move to permanent work may prove to be more beneficial after the rules come into effect. For many, contracting will remain appealing regardless of increased tax responsibilities, however it’s important to factor in any change in income that IR35 may bring about. Businesses are being warned not to make blanket assessments that cover all their contractors, as this can leave workers without a fair assessment and risk them paying unnecessary taxes without equivalent employment rights. Instead, businesses should consider IR35 status on a case-by-case basis or they may risk losing out on top talent. The HMRC has released a consultation document for businesses to prepare for the IR35 changes, recommending identifying and reviewing current contract workforce status and putting processes in place for taking on new workers. At Marks Sattin, we pride ourselves on keeping abreast of all industry legislation, updates and changes that affect our candidates and clients. Speak with us about how we can help you. References: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44887623 https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/articles/trendsinselfemploymentintheuk/2018-02-07 https://www.contractorcalculator.co.uk/what_is_ir35.aspx https://www.axa.co.uk/business-insurance/business-guardian-angel/how-ir35-changes-will-affect-freelancers-and-self-employed-contractors/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/ir35-rules/new-contractor-tax/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/ir35-rules/how-will-new-rules-impact-business/ HMRC consultation document

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Employees in the United Kingdom can be categorised as full-time, part-time, casual, freelance and contract workers

Read full article
Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai

Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai

Roles in demand across Specialist Markets
Roles in demand across Specialist Markets

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Professional Services

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

06/10/20

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

2020 has been an unexpected year across the world, and it has been crucial to monitor and deal with all the effects of the Covid pandemic in business and in our personal lives. Amidst this crisis we have also had the uncertainty surrounding Brexit looming over us, which has left many businesses trying to deal with the immediate challenges to society and the economy at large. The effects of both have been felt, and we can see this within the jobs market.   As experts within specialist markets we have been privy to fluctuations within specific industries. Below are some of our observations across the market.Custom and duties tax specialists We have seen an increase in activity and growth across custom and duties tax specialists for large import/export FTSE businesses. Particularly businesses are looking for candidates on an interim basis to make sure effective processes and controls are implemented. This is an evolving space and once we have further clarity we expect demand to increase. In the last 6 months, we’ve seen an increase in recruitment activity from businesses in industries such as food manufacturing and FMCG that have had an increased demand for their products on the back of lockdown. In addition to this, businesses that do a significant amount of importing and exporting see customs and duty as a key area of focus with Brexit looming, and we have advised and recruited for several clients who have required specialist knowledge. This is a niche skill set that can be provided at premium rates by consultancy firms, but there is a recent trend to bring this expertise in house. The cost of doing this would be in the region of £40-50k for a perm hire and c£250 per day for a temp hire - watch this space if you're a candidate within this market.  Audit and riskAudit and risk have also experienced an increase in resource on both the temporary and permanent markets. As organisations seek to learn effectiveness lessons from the crisis they require resource to conduct and undertake Covid specific reviews. In addition, the offering of flexible working arrangements also provides a great opportunity to test network capabilities as well as controls across user access, disaster recovery, business continuity, as well as high level IT controls testing to ensure remote working does not compromise the risk appetite of the business. Start ups Over the past 6-12 months we have also undertaken a number of start up engagements, helping businesses recruit permanent heads of department to develop strategy internally. This is a trend we expect to continue as businesses look to cut spend on consultancy fees and take ownership of these disciplines, ensuring a consistent level of quality and cost efficiency.  To view more of our live roles, visit our job search page.

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Amidst this crisis we have also had the uncertainty surrounding Brexit looming over us, which has left many businesses trying to deal with the immediate challenges to society and the economy at large.

Read full article
David Clamp

by

David Clamp

David Clamp

by

David Clamp