Finance Manager

  1. Permanent
£45,000 - £50,000 per annum + 10% Bonus
48654007_1600102332

The details

Finance Manager

Looking for a qualified accountant with Financial Services or Legislation experience to join a growing business in Basingstoke.

You will be managing a team of 3 in the preparation of daily, monthly and annual financial and reporting requirements.

You will be liaising with external Auditors, overseeing the monthly payroll and continuously seeking enhancements and efficiencies.


Responsibilities
* Month end and Year end - preparation, review and posting of journals

  • Review and sign off monthly balance sheet reconciliations and monthly payroll
  • Assisting with year end Audit requests
  • Supporting the Finance operations manager, understanding variances to normal run rates
  • Making sure all transactions are recorded in harmony with business and regulatory requirements

    Qualifications
    * Must be qualified ACCA/ACA/CIMA
  • Practice of managing teams
  • +3 years experience working in a Financial Services Finance Team
  • Able to work in a fast paced environment, continuously changing environment
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