Lead Python Developer - Fintech

  1. Permanent
£75,000 - £80,000 per annum
BBBH162816

City of London, London

The details

Senior / Lead Python Developer - Fintech

An established Fintech is looking to hire an expert Python Software Engineer / Developer to head up a high-performance team of engineers within its growing tech area.

This is very much a hands on role where you will be driving innovation to grow and expand the firm's suite of online financial products.

The organisation's office is in the City but the role will be remote / home-based during current restrictions.

Essential skills

  • Computer Science or Software Engineering degree or equivalent industry experience.
  • Expert knowledge of Python 3+, with a proven commercial track record spanning a minimum of 5 years
  • Strong understanding of software design patterns, object oriented programming, data structures and computational complexity theory.
  • Some exposure to another object oriented programming language (e.g. Java, C++, C#).
  • Good experience with relational databases, both from the perspective of writing code to interface with them as well as optimising access patterns against large datasets.
  • Recent experience using modern testing tools used for unit testing and functional testing.
  • Understanding of the importance of high quality tests which provide extensive coverage of application code
  • Strong experience and knowledge of Django, in particular the use of Django Rest Framework.
  • Experience using Git, as well as basic knowledge of Unix-based operating systems.
  • Experience defining automated software delivery pipelines, e.g. using Jenkins or a similar CI tool.

This is an opportunity to join a dynamic organization, at the forefront of innovation within its field, so please send your CV to Michael Moretti for immediate consideration.

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