Senior IT Auditor

  1. Permanent
£33,000 - £45,000 per annum
BBBH161132_1599753545

The details


Marks Sattin is working with a leading firm who are recruiting for a Senior IT Auditor to join the dedicated IT Audit team. Working in this team, you will join a highly skilled department who have a great reputation in the market with clients across the north.


Within the team, you will play a hands on role assessing traditional and emerging technology risks and support audit functions when undertaking annual IT audit planning (including the production of the IT audit plan itself).


The business has a formal IT risk evaluation methodology to ensure the assessment of risk is both consistent and comprehensive, drawing upon deeper skills within the team as required (for example, cyber security threat intelligence).

The methodology recognises six main areas of IT risk:

· IT governance
· Managing change
· IT operations
· IT continuity
· IT security
· Strategic leadership

In the role your responsibilities will be:

  • To provide a high quality service to clients in respect of internal audit assignments including both operational and IT assurance elements.
  • Ensure remote and on site audit work is carried out, including allocation of work within the designated team.
  • Ensure the work undertaken is in accordance with the approved plan and budget
  • Ensure effective communication between the client and key internal stakeholders.
  • Obtain sufficient evidence to support conclusions drawn and document this within the electronic working papers system, Pentana.
  • Adopt an integrated assurance approach to audit assignments to include both operational and IT assurance requirements
  • Suggest logical commercially viable solutions to problems.
  • Prepare draft reports for each audit on time, to enable agreed client protocols to be met
  • Ensure closing meetings are held on each assignment prior to leaving site or remotely
  • Respond to client concerns in an efficient and effective manner


Ideally you will be fully qualified or working towards a professional qualified that lends itself towards IT Audit (ACA, CISA, IIA) and have exposure to working across the 3rd line of defence.


IT Assurance: Internal IT Audit, IT Governance, risk management, IT/Cyber security & business continuity, IT project management, Data Analytics, Controls Assurance (including Third Party Assurance).

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