Senior Tax Manager (In-House)

  1. Permanent
£65,000 - £75,000 per annum + benefits
BBBH161825

Leeds, West Yorkshire

The details

Marks Sattin are delighted to be working in partnership with a market leading business based in Leeds to recruit a Senior Tax Manager.

This is a broad role that will involve leading a team and overseeing both direct and indirect compliance and reporting. If successful, you will also be responsible for managing tax projects and you'll work closely with the senior leadership team, including CFO, implementing tax strategy.

In order to be successful it is essential that you have a proven track record in a tax focused role, either in practice or industry, and you'll be ACA/CTA qualified with significant PQE. Due to the seniority of the role, you must possess exceptional management and interpersonal skills in order to successfully lead a team and communicate effectively with senior stakeholders.

If you are suitable, please apply, or alternatively contact me for more details.

jobs

Related jobs

Interim Group Tax Manager

Salary:

£450 - £550 per day

Location:

Yorkshire and the Humber

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Tax

Industry

Manufacturing

Qualification

Fully qualified

Salary

£350 - £450

Contract Type:

Contract

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

BBBH162095

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

26/11/20

Andy Craven

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Andy Craven
Andy Craven

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Andy Craven
Find out more
Supply Chain Planning Manager - FMCG

Salary:

£40,000 - £45,000 per annum

Location:

Liverpool, Merseyside

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Project & Programme Management

Industry

Consumer & Retail

Salary

£40,000 - £50,000

Qualification

None specified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Supply Chain Planning Manager - Manufacturing/FMCG

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

162029

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

05/11/20

Annabelle Surch

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Annabelle Surch
Annabelle Surch

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Annabelle Surch
Find out more
Systems Accountant

Salary:

£50,000 - £55,000 per annum + Bonus £1,000 - £4,000

Location:

Abingdon, Oxfordshire

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Part Qualified & Transactional Finance

Industry

Pharmaceuticals & Life Sciences

Salary

£50,000 - £60,000

Qualification

None specified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Systems Accountant to support non finance colleagues and manage the companies financial systems.

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

162088

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

26/11/20

Harvey Allan

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Harvey Allan
Harvey Allan

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Harvey Allan
Find out more
Group Financial Accountant

Salary:

£55,000 - £62,000 per annum

Location:

Maidstone, Kent

Market

Financial Services

Job Discipline

Qualified Finance

Industry

Insurance

Salary

£60,000 - £70,000

Qualification

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.description - en-GB **

Large financial services group in Kent recruiting for an experienced financial accountant

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.reference - en-GB **

SCH162028

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.expirydate - en-GB **

19/11/20

Sanjay Chandwani

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Sanjay Chandwani
Sanjay Chandwani

** DEFAULT listwidget.vacancypartial.author - en-GB **

Sanjay Chandwani
Find out more
View all jobs
posts

Related articles

Roles in demand across Specialist Markets
Roles in demand across Specialist Markets

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Professional Services

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

06/10/20

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

2020 has been an unexpected year across the world, and it has been crucial to monitor and deal with all the effects of the Covid pandemic in business and in our personal lives. Amidst this crisis we have also had the uncertainty surrounding Brexit looming over us, which has left many businesses trying to deal with the immediate challenges to society and the economy at large. The effects of both have been felt, and we can see this within the jobs market.   As experts within specialist markets we have been privy to fluctuations within specific industries. Below are some of our observations across the market.Custom and duties tax specialists We have seen an increase in activity and growth across custom and duties tax specialists for large import/export FTSE businesses. Particularly businesses are looking for candidates on an interim basis to make sure effective processes and controls are implemented. This is an evolving space and once we have further clarity we expect demand to increase. In the last 6 months, we’ve seen an increase in recruitment activity from businesses in industries such as food manufacturing and FMCG that have had an increased demand for their products on the back of lockdown. In addition to this, businesses that do a significant amount of importing and exporting see customs and duty as a key area of focus with Brexit looming, and we have advised and recruited for several clients who have required specialist knowledge. This is a niche skill set that can be provided at premium rates by consultancy firms, but there is a recent trend to bring this expertise in house. The cost of doing this would be in the region of £40-50k for a perm hire and c£250 per day for a temp hire - watch this space if you're a candidate within this market.  Audit and riskAudit and risk have also experienced an increase in resource on both the temporary and permanent markets. As organisations seek to learn effectiveness lessons from the crisis they require resource to conduct and undertake Covid specific reviews. In addition, the offering of flexible working arrangements also provides a great opportunity to test network capabilities as well as controls across user access, disaster recovery, business continuity, as well as high level IT controls testing to ensure remote working does not compromise the risk appetite of the business. Start ups Over the past 6-12 months we have also undertaken a number of start up engagements, helping businesses recruit permanent heads of department to develop strategy internally. This is a trend we expect to continue as businesses look to cut spend on consultancy fees and take ownership of these disciplines, ensuring a consistent level of quality and cost efficiency.  To view more of our live roles, visit our job search page.

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Amidst this crisis we have also had the uncertainty surrounding Brexit looming over us, which has left many businesses trying to deal with the immediate challenges to society and the economy at large.

Read full article
David Clamp

by

David Clamp

David Clamp

by

David Clamp

Will IR35 affect your business?
Will IR35 affect your business?

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

General

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

20/06/19

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

Employees in the United Kingdom can be categorised as full-time, part-time, casual, freelance and contract workers, with the self-employed bracket now making up 15% of the entire working population. The number of self-employed workers jumped from 3.3 million in 2001 to 4.8 million in 2017, with a corresponding fall in the unemployment rate showing the overall boost in jobs growth from the rise in self-employment. However, the attractive market for freelancers and contractors has been hit with some uncertainty in recent times, thanks largely to the 2018 Autumn Budget’s announcement of IR35 tax reforms. Here’s what the new IR35 rules could mean for you and your business: What is IR35? IR35 is a piece of legislation originally introduced to the UK in 1999. Its purpose is to differentiate between those workers who operate as genuine contractors and those who work as ‘disguised’ employees to avoid paying tax. It came about to challenge contractors who were taking advantage of the tax efficiencies of working through a limited company, with the aim of defending both the Exchequer from lost taxes and protecting workers’ rights from unscrupulous employees. However, the IR35 has proven to be ambiguous for many, with some contractors taking advantage of loopholes and a lack of clarity. Hence, the new IR35 rules aim to tighten up the contractor market and ensure tax avoidance loopholes are closed. How does IR35 work? There are three principles that can help to determine employment status and whether a contractor falls inside or outside IR35: Control (the degree of control the client has over the work a contractor does and how and when they do it) Substitution (whether the worker needs to do the work themselves or if they could send a substitute in their place) Mutuality of obligation (whether the employer is obliged to offer work and the contractor is obliged to accept it). Additionally, the contract type, provision of equipment and whether a worker is “part and parcel” of a business can all help to determine whether someone falls inside or outside IR35. The change in IR35 rules shifts the responsibility to determine tax status away from the contractor and onto the business that takes them on. Until now, contractors have been able to self-determine their status, however as of April 2020, when the new rules come into effect for the private sector, companies will risk being fined if they don’t make the correct assessment.  How will IR35 impact contract workers? It’s anticipated that many contract workers who have been enjoying the tax benefits of working outside IR35 will fall under the legislation when employers are tasked with determining their status. This will see more contractors having tax and National Insurance contributions deducted from their pay. However, if you operate as a legitimate small business and are determined to work outside of IR35, you will not be affected by the rule changes. How will IR35 impact employers? The major change for businesses is that they will now be responsible for determining the IR35 status of any contractor working for the company. The new rules will only apply to medium and large sized businesses, so contractors who work for small businesses can continue to set their own IR35 statuses. Those businesses that the IR35 rule changes do apply to will face paying back taxes and fines should they be found to be noncompliant. What should I do to prepare for IR35? Contractors may wish to speak to an accountant or personal finance expert to determine whether IR35 will impact them and if a move to permanent work may prove to be more beneficial after the rules come into effect. For many, contracting will remain appealing regardless of increased tax responsibilities, however it’s important to factor in any change in income that IR35 may bring about. Businesses are being warned not to make blanket assessments that cover all their contractors, as this can leave workers without a fair assessment and risk them paying unnecessary taxes without equivalent employment rights. Instead, businesses should consider IR35 status on a case-by-case basis or they may risk losing out on top talent. The HMRC has released a consultation document for businesses to prepare for the IR35 changes, recommending identifying and reviewing current contract workforce status and putting processes in place for taking on new workers. At Marks Sattin, we pride ourselves on keeping abreast of all industry legislation, updates and changes that affect our candidates and clients. Speak with us about how we can help you. References: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44887623 https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/articles/trendsinselfemploymentintheuk/2018-02-07 https://www.contractorcalculator.co.uk/what_is_ir35.aspx https://www.axa.co.uk/business-insurance/business-guardian-angel/how-ir35-changes-will-affect-freelancers-and-self-employed-contractors/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/ir35-rules/new-contractor-tax/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/ir35-rules/how-will-new-rules-impact-business/ HMRC consultation document

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Employees in the United Kingdom can be categorised as full-time, part-time, casual, freelance and contract workers

Read full article
Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai

Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai

How is Fintech changing the commerce industry?
How is Fintech changing the commerce industry?

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Commerce & Industry

** DEFAULT postresults.contenttypelabel - en-GB **

General

10/12/18

** DEFAULT postresults.summarylabel - en-GB **

Fintech is constantly rewriting the rules on how companies operate, how businesses lend money, and how customers pay for goods. It’s exciting to see how it’s changing the way we conduct transactions across the market, and it’s going from strength to strength. Fintech was the leading sector for investment last year, with UK financial technology firms attracting a record £1.34 billion in venture capital funding. With the fintech market constantly evolving, from blockchain to automation, let’s look at how it’s impacting commerce and people’s roles:  Flexibility and Accessibility  One of the key benefits of fintech is its flexibility and the ease with which it can be adapted to suit the evolving digital market. In today’s hyper-connected world, it offers accessibility; casual shoppers, business people, and even companies can access their money instantaneously on banking apps, and pay for services with the touch of a button. It’s a new way of doing business, and digital-only banks like N26 and Revolut are springing up to deal with this method of frictionless payment, challenging traditional banks as they do so.  Falling behind means losing business, and fintech is disrupting the rules of business. The trend towards instant accessibility is raising client expectations: companies need to ensure that they’re providing a high-quality online service to their customers if they want to remain competitive. Whether it’s a mobile-friendly service or a 24/7 helpline, flexibility and digital accessibility are today’s keywords, and this is creating a demand for faster, more efficient ways of doing business. Innovation in Auditing The rise of fintech has also brought about a revolution in the role of the auditor. Blockchain technology has repeatedly been hailed as a breakthrough in the burgeoning crypto economy, receiving more than £500m of investment in the UK alone over the past year- and for good reason!  Blockchain is a decentralised online ‘ledger’ that records all transactions made for a particular company. Each transaction creates a ‘link’ that is locked into an online chain of similar transactions and makes it extremely difficult to tamper with; to interfere with one transaction, you need to tamper with all of them.  The biggest challenge an auditor faces is having the relevant data on hand to carry out their daily responsibilities; now that businesses are operating essentially in ‘real time’, a blockchain ledger containing essential data for any business can be monitored and maintained by the internal audit team, and then verified by an external team. For anybody working in accounting, adopting blockchain is an excellent way to minimise error, risk and enhance accountability, whilst also freeing up time to concentrate on other important tasks.   AI and Conversational Commerce From deep learning to analytics, AI is playing a vital role in influencing the market. Indeed, fintech companies are turning to smart technology to develop new interfaces, such as apps, through which they can learn more about their client base than ever before.  Using smart software helps companies in commerce to automate day to day tasks like data analysis, freeing up time normally spent on time-consuming or mundane parts of their job to do more valuable, high-level work. In fact, AI can do everything from draft contracts to analyse customer data and create actionable insights into the way an organisation does business; naturally, fintech companies that provide this software are thriving.  The benefits go further. For accounting teams, using automation and RegTech can even help them detect fraud, as the system can process, analyse and monitor customer behaviour to detect suspicious transactions and flag them for further investigation. With so many uses, it’s no wonder that fintech is paving the way for teams to do their day to day jobs more efficiently than ever before. An interconnected market  With all of this innovation taking place, we’re expecting to see more collaboration between big business - especially in commerce - and smaller start-ups, as both sides seek to leverage the other's expertise and gain more visibility in the market. Companies like Mastercard are partnering with and nurturing start-ups in order to encourage innovation within the market; still others, like Visa, are partnering with start-ups like Paidy, which offers post-payment credit services for eCommerce customers in Japan. As the fintech market expands, expect to see more of this collaboration, as firms grow closer together in order to innovate their customer offering. Looking to the future with Marks Sattin At Marks Sattin, we’re excited to see what the future will bring for the commerce industry, especially as fintech strengthens its grip on the market. It’s time to get involved: take the next step in your career and become part of the change with our range of jobs in commerce and industry, or read our blog for more insights.   

** DEFAULT postresults.teaserlabel - en-GB **

Fintech is constantly rewriting the rules on how companies operate, how businesses lend money, and how customers pay for goods.

Read full article
Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai

Pres Pillai

by

Pres Pillai