Data Analytics Manager - London

  1. Permanent
£60,000 - £70,000 per annum
BBBH16675_1600787899

City of London, London

The details

Data Analytics Manager - London

A global player in the logistics space is looking for a Data Analytics Manager to lead and develop a data analytics strategy and capability across their UK operation.

This will include the provision of high quality reporting processes and tools for the programme as well as the development of a data science capability to ensure the firm is able to exploit their valuable information and data using the latest tools and techniques.

The role will be home based initially and then it's the company's prestigious central London offices.

Responsibilities

  • Lead, develop and own the firm's strategy for data analysis, ensuring it is in line with business needs, the Delivery Strategy, Information Strategy and ICT Strategy
  • Lead work to enable the organisation to get maximum value from its information
  • Engage across industry to monitor emerging technologies for relevance to the company's needs and proposes potential solutions to senior stakeholders in the areas of business intelligence, management reporting, data exploitation, data analytics and data science
  • Lead work to support stakeholders across the business to ensure data analysis capabilities are aligned with business needs and strategy
  • Establish and lead a high-performing data analytics team as a key part of the overall Information Management team.

Experience & Background

  • Ability to deliver value and identify opportunities for the application of information and data analytics to organisations and large delivery programmes
  • Ability to influence stakeholders at senior levels to understand needs and explain opportunities for technology
  • Delivering technology change, including planning, creating business cases and delivering projects
  • Leadership Ability, leading and developing teams of professionals delivering a service to the wider organisation
  • Ability to produce and present documents and reports to a variety of audiences, including internal stakeholders at various levels in the organisation
  • Ability to plan, explain the case for and deliver business and technology change
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