Financial Accountant - Private Equity (NQ ACA)

  1. Permanent
30% Discretionary Bonus + Benefits
TOW120234

London

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Financial Accountant - Private Equity

This is the ideal first step out of practice for any newly/recently qualified ACA who is looking for a forward thinking, Financial Accountant position within the asset management industry.

The firm is one of the UK's leading private equity firms, based in the City. They have a head-count of around 100 and the finance team is 12 strong. They are not like a 'typical' financial services firm - culture is incredibly important to them and this is easy to see during the interview process where it feels more like a conversation as oppose to a grilling. It's friendly and sociable environment with an open floor policy - a great place to work, learn and develop. Added to this, work/life balance is incredibly important to them and there is no pressure for pointless office-time. They are one of the most progressive investments firms in the capital and a genuinely brilliant place to work.

The role is broad and covers a wide range of both financial and management accounting duties. It reports into the Financial Controller and has responsibility for the work of a part qualified, assistant management accountant. The responsibilities include:

  • Preparation of the month end management accounts and report including financial information, commentary on budgetary variances and other non-financial data;
  • Preparation of month end balance sheet reconciliations, including purchases, sales and nominal ledgers;
  • Assisting with annual budgeting and reforecasting processes;
  • Preparation of quarterly regulatory reporting requirements, including VAT, FCA and National Statistics returns;
  • Assisting with preparation of annual audit files for statutory auditors, and preparation of statutory accounts for entities within the House structure;
  • Maintenance of records of firm's co-investments in the funds.
  • Supervision of accounts receivable function including quarterly director fee billing, management fee billing, deal fee billing and other ad hoc billing
  • Assisting with preparation of data for annual insurance process
  • Preparation of monthly payroll.

This is the ideal opportunity for any newly qualified ACA (or equivalent) looking for a broad role in an exciting business with progression and development opportunities. The nature of the work that this private equity firm is involved with, investing in a range of tech, renewable energy, retail and media businesses means that there will be exposure to a number industries meaning; no door is closed in the successful candidates future.

The remuneration and benefits on offer are also incredibly competitive. The base will range from £50,000 - £55,000 depending on experience with a dsicretionary bonus on top (likely 30%). Furthermore they offer fantastic private benefits including 29 days holiday that increases with each year of service.

The hiring manager is open on industry background and size of practice. With this in mind, if you are from the Big 4, a top 20 firm or a top 100 firm and you are interested in working in a broad, commercial accounting position for one the UK's most successful private equity firms, do not hesitate to apply. Interviews will be set up in July and start dates open - for instance if you are qualifying this year, the role is still open to you.

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