Forensic and Investigations - Senior Manager

  1. Permanent
Negotiable
BBBH161211_1599733733

The details

Marks Sattin are delighted to be partnered with a very reputable and global organisation to recruit a Senior Manager for their growing Forensic Accounting Team. A fantastic opportunity to further your career in a progressive environment.

Overview:

As a senior manager in the regional forensics team you will be expected to get involved in high profile and complex assignment in areas such as fraud, anti-bribery and corruption, financial and misconduct investigation and regulatory compliance matters.

You will be expected to lead and manager project teams, reporting to the Director or Partner and supporting them through from initial instruction to provision of written and oral evidence and any subsequent work.

You will be a key point of contact for the instructing solicitors and clients and will be involved in all areas of the case, including project management and delivery.

Responsibilities:

You will be expected to:

  • Lead complex assignments under the supervision of Director or Partner;
  • Supervise project teams and supervise junior staff;
  • Play an active role in the scoping and planning of engagements;
  • Assist in developing strategies to solve complex technical challenges and to identify issues and challenges with data or calculations;
  • Review and input into potentially complex financial models;
  • Present and explain findings in a clear and concise manner;
  • Draft and review reports;
  • Active participation in meetings (e.g. team meetings, client/ lawyer meetings, meeting of experts, conferences with counsel etc.) including organisation, delivery of findings, identifying next steps;
  • Ownership of general project management, including project finances, risk issues, budgeting and billing;
  • Think on your feet and deal calmly with unexpected challenges;
  • Be actively involved in business development activities, including devising and leading initiatives aimed at winning new work; Continue to develop your own network of work referrers

Requirements

Qualifications and experience

  • An accounting qualification is essential (e.g. ACA, ACCA, CIMA, CIPFA);
  • Fraud and financial crime related qualifications preferred (e.g. ACFS, CFE, CAMS)
  • Forensic accounting experience

Personal skills

  • Logical, analytical, articulate, confident and professional;
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Strong interpersonal skills
  • Strong interest in business development and ability to generate new ideas to expand forensic service lines
  • Willing to travel regularly locally, nationally and internationally.
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