IT Application Support Analyst - Financial Services - London

  1. Permanent
£50,000 - £65,000 per annum
AppSupp/1911P

London

The details

Outstanding opportunity - Experienced Application Support Analyst required for leading financial services organisation providing a refreshing approach to wealth & asset management. The company has seen accelerated growth & there are few companies that have been on such an upward curve. They continue to invest in technology & IT Infrastructure together with strong opportunities for progression, personal development & growth.

As Application Support Analyst you will provide IT application support activities including maintenance, administration, second line & third line support, & will have experience of web based applications in financial services, ideally wealth management

Application Support Analyst - Financial Services - London - package £50-£65k dep on exp

Expertise & Responsibilities - Application Support Analyst

▪ Strong experience as Application Support Analyst, Application Support Engineer, Applications Analyst, Applications Engineer or similar

▪ You will have experience of web-based applications, ideally in a financial services with understanding of wealth management / asset management

▪ This appealing role would also suit someone with development understanding ie application development & moved into applications support

▪ It is expected you will have a degree background in in IT related subject eg Computer Science or similar

▪ Experience in the following is desirable - Data Warehousing, document management systems &/or ITIL

This is a Priority requirement - Send your cv urgently. In the current climate this is an excellent opportunity to progress both your career & personal development working for a company that invests in its staff

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