Project Manager - Banking

  1. Permanent
Negotiable
BPM09RMC_1600186283

Dublin City Centre, Dublin

The details

Responsibilities

  • Management & delivery of complex multi-stream one or more projects/programme in accordance with client Project Management Methodology, including managing project scope, schedule, financials ,risk, issue, assumptions, dependencies, resourcing and governance.
  • Plan and manage projects, incl. documentation of project scope, scheduling and monitoring of delivery; organisation and leadership of governance meetings; preparation and distribution of progress reports; management and monitoring of project costs/budget and cash flow/invoicing; management and correction of deviations from plans; and communication with relevant stakeholders.
  • Early identification & management of internal/external dependencies across the Project/Programme.
  • Communicate and manage Project/Programme risks and issues.
  • Maintain a standard-format roadmap of inflight deliverables and roadmap, for use in project, programme and portfolio reporting and tracking.
  • Monitor benefits realisation in the form of key outcome metrics.
  • Coordinate and manage the development and implementation of the business case and financial management to project close out, incl. preparation and presentation at relevant governance reviews.
  • Partner with Product Owner and Solutions Delivery Manager in the overall achievement of programme/project outcomes.
  • Partner with Product Owner, Solutions Delivery Manager to continuously improve governance processes and ways of working.

To qualify for the role you must have

  • 7+yrs experience in a project management in financial services.
  • Experience of delivery of complex projects and strong presentation skills.
  • Highly experienced in financial, stakeholder and people management.
  • Experience of working on projects through the full delivery life-cycle (from project concept/initiation to closing)

Ideally, you'll also have

  • Ability to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty
  • Primary Degree
  • Project Management Certification e.g. PRINCE2 is desirable

Skills and attributes for success

Decision Making

  • Identify and make decisions that have a significant project impact; escalating decisions that cannot be resolved within the project in line with project/programme governance structure.

Problem Solving

  • Identifies, drives and leads problem solving and issue management for the project deliverables.
  • Accountable for project team adherence to client delivery methodology and ensures any deviations are addressed.
  • Influences and contributes to continuous improvement of methodology and policy.

Collaboration

  • Collaborates across the organisation & externally, including external regulatory bodies and stakeholders.
  • Identifies and manages cross functional interdependencies

Level of Influence

  • Influences and negotiates project outcomes with senior stakeholders, often across multiple functions.
  • Prepares and presents analysis, insights and recommendation to assist agreed governance forums with decision making
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