Real Estate and Assets Manager - Public Sector

  1. Permanent
£50,000 - £55,000 per annum
BBBH165051

Manchester, Greater Manchester

The details

Real Estate and Assets Manager - Public Sector

We are working closely with one of the largest Practices in the North West who are looking for a Manager to lead in Real Estate and Asset advisory for their Public sector clients.
This position would suit someone who is experienced in developing and delivering advisory mandates to central and local government and other public sector clients. You will be comfortable working in a wider team, but also leading your own business development proposals and client delivery engagements, providing guidance and support to more junior members of the team.

Responsibilities:

  • Responsible for proposal development.
  • Contributes to the delivery of major end-to-end client projects to quality, timeliness and financial targets and overseeing smaller projects
  • Coaching and developing junior colleagues, providing guidance and development.
  • Develops and builds a network across the sector and across Grant Thornton to identify commercial opportunities
  • Develops methods and knowledge within the REA and PSA teams
  • Supports and promotes thought leadership pieces circulated to clients.
  • Manages the delivery of own and project targets in terms of utilisation, revenue and gross margin
  • Demonstrates excellent project management skills with a record of delivering projects to time, quality and financial deadlines
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills with experience of reporting and presenting to clients or relevant stakeholders
  • Acts with integrity and in line with our organisational values
  • Has a strong awareness and adherence to the firm's risk management processes and procedures, professional standards and ethics.

If you would like to hear more about this role, please feel free to reach out to us.

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