Senior Accounting Executive

  1. Permanent
£35,000 - £39,500 per annum
KAH12021

Bristol

The details

Our client is looking for a qualified accountant to join their business outsourcing team as a Senior Executive. This is an interesting role as it is a different option that you do not see in a traditional accounting firm. You will work with a portfolio of clients made up of large, international businesses in a range of industry sectors. It is a varied role and some of the duties you can expect to be involved in are below:

  • Day to day responisbilty of client and team of juniors
  • Produce and review financial client information
  • Ensure all accounting needs are met on time
  • Act as the main point of contact for the client and build strong relationships with both the client and internal team members
  • Be involved in new client transactions
  • Assist with marketing activites and other non accounting related activites

This role would suit a qualified accountant who trained with an accountancy practice in either audit or accounting. You must be ACA or ACCA qualified or equivalent. It is a great option for someone considering a move into industry. There is also lots of progression available within the team and wider firm.

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