Sr BI Data Analyst - Fintech £50k

  1. Permanent
£45,000 - £50,000 per annum
JTBIDA0003

London

The details

Sr BI Data Analyst - Fintech

Requirements:

We are looking for a Senior BI Data Analyst to help us optimise every stage of the customer life-cycle and improve uptake of our full range of services. You will have a rich and fascinating data set at your disposal which you will leverage to generate insights (both retrospective and predictive) that will help the company grow from half a million to one million customers, whilst making a profit at the same time.

We are keen to talk to candidates with 2-3 years of experience working as part of a BI team.

Responsibilities:

  • Continuous improvement and development of the BI infrastructure
  • Supporting the Product team with insights that help improve design, targeting and uptake
  • Supporting the Marketing team with analysis of channel performance and insights that improve both acquisition volume and return on investment
  • Supporting the Strategy team with analysis and insight on company KPIs and other company metrics to help set our future objectives and strategy
  • Ensuring any changes in KPIs are well understood and explained to stakeholders * Designing, running and evaluating A/B tests across various customer touch-points
  • Performing regression analyses to pick out signals from noise
  • Regular cohort analysis to help us understand changes in customer lifetime value, among other things
  • Analysis of churn and reactivation patterns to help us keep customers with the company for as long as possible
  • Supporting with financial modelling and investor/board data requests
  • Packaging analytical projects into neat, digestible presentations with clear action points
  • Assisting with BI team management and objective-setting * Sharing your experience with the team and training junior colleagues
  • Helping with ad hoc data requests from across the team
  • Working with the rest of the BI team and the Engineering team to integrate new data sources into our reporting suite and improve our code base
  • Commercially savvy (not just a statistician), with a track record of delivering analysis that increases revenue, reduces cost or reduces churn
  • Track record of taking ownership of analytical projects from end-to-end, often with little or no supervision
  • Experience of creating deliverables for C-level audiences and challenging the assumptions of senior colleagues
  • Programming (R/Python) experience strongly preferred

Also, nice to have:

  • Experience of working with Marketing and Product teams
  • Experience of wrangling data from various sources using APIs
  • Experience of financial modelling
  • Experience with data visualisation software, preferably Power BI
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