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Finance Business Partner

Salary:

£50,000 - £60,000 per annum

Location:

London

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Qualified Finance

Newly Qualified Finance

Industry

Consumer & Retail

Salary

£60,000 - £70,000

Qualification

Finalist / Newly qualified

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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Leading International Hospitality Business based in C. London actively looking for a Qualified Finance Business Partner

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23/10/20

Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo
Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo
Find out more
Senior Commercial Analyst

Salary:

£50,000 - £60,000 per annum

Location:

London

Market

Commerce & Industry

Job Discipline

Qualified Finance

Newly Qualified Finance

Industry

Property and Infrastructure

Real Estate

Salary

£60,000 - £70,000

Qualification

Finalist / Newly qualified

Fully qualified

Contract Type:

Permanent

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Leading real estate business based in London actively seeking a Senior Commercial Analyst.

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06/10/20

Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo
Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo
Find out more
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My articles

Thinking of taking recruitment in-house? Pros and cons of going it alone
Thinking of taking recruitment in-house? Pros and cons of going it alone

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HR

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General

15/09/20

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The economy has contracted in the wake of Covid-19, and so too have business budgets. We’ve seen a slowdown in recruitment activity around the world, with UK hiring halving in June 2020 compared to June 2019, and some organisations shedding staff or closing their doors entirely. Despite these trying times, however, we are also seeing many businesses emerge stronger from lockdown. Some industries are experiencing growth – the likes of pharma, e-commerce and digital communications are all thriving – and many organisations are now looking to the future. Part of this includes strengthening teams and adding value through the strategic hiring of A-player professionals.This raises an oft-asked question: Is in-house recruitment a better option than using a recruitment agency? With all eyes on budgets and the bottom line, some might argue that an in-house hiring process will save on cost – but does it deliver the same results, and how much is your internal team’s time worth? We’re exploring the pros and cons of in-house recruitment.Pro: It can seem more cost-effectiveWhen reducing budgets and trimming costs, the outsourced recruitment function can be the first thing to suffer. External expenditure on hiring is a cost some companies think they can no longer justify. Instead, some businesses take their recruitment in-house, relying on hiring managers, HR teams or dedicated in-house recruitment professionals to identify, attract and hire the right people. Aside from time, there are many hidden costs to recruiting inhouse that business leaders do not anticipate. " These can include: subscriptions to premium social media accounts, advertising on job boards and other platforms, recruitment software and having a presence at recruitment shows. If your business hires high volumes every year, then these costs may be justified, however this is limited by both the capacity and capability of your in-house team.Con: It can be extremely time-consumingNever underestimate the value of your team’s time. Specialist recruitment companies have vast networks of vetted candidates, both active and passive. They tend to be well-known in their fields, highly social and always making new connections. This means their potential candidate network usually far exceeds that of an in-house team, and they can contact pre-vetted candidates quickly. In-house teams can struggle to have this reach and impact and typically take longer to search for, vet and contact candidates.Within Marks Sattin, we’re seeing some companies choosing to take their recruitment in-house, only to get in touch down the line after realising how much time it takes to identify a quality shortlist of candidates. When you consider that one third of vacancies in the UK are considered hard to fill, it’s no surprise that teams often struggle when taking recruitment in-house. Writing and advertising vacancies, proactively headhunting and contacting passive candidates, responding to questions and applications and vetting CVs all takes an extraordinary amount of time – and that’s before you even start scheduling interviews. For in-house professionals who are also juggling other responsibilities, this can become too much and many businesses end up reverting back to an outsourced model.Pro: You can boost your employer brandingAn in-house function means you’ll own the end-to-end recruitment process and be solely responsible for the candidate experience. This presents a great opportunity to build your employer brand and take control of how you are perceived by potential employees.If you outsource your recruitment function to a specialist recruitment agency, you’ll be trusting them to represent your company appropriately and guarantee the best possible candidate experience. They will often act as the initial touch point and introduction to your role and company. This means a good recruitment agency will take the time to get a strong understanding of your company culture, requirements, role and business objectives.Con: You miss out on expert insightsIf you hire an in-house recruiter to your organisation, make sure they have a deep understanding of your industry and wider market trends. A good recruitment partner will not only understand what developments, opportunities and challenges are emerging in your industry – whether that’s a new technology making waves or new legislation creating qualification requirements – but also what the market is like for candidates and clients. Crucially, they need to know about the specific roles they are searching for.This is especially important for executive search, where passive candidates need extra incentives to change roles. Executive recruiters must understand their markets inside out, and know what will incentivise certain professionals to move, something which in-house teams may not always understand. In-house professionals usually recruit for roles across the whole business, whether that’s a marketing intern, CFO or diversity manager, and it can be challenging for them to get a deep understanding of each of these very different roles.Save time and get the best candidates with Marks SattinWe are proud to be recruitment specialist in our markets of financial services, commerce and industry, professional services, executive search, business change and technology. We have 32 years’ experience and pride ourselves on repeat business, excellent customer service and our candidate care, where we source, meet and screen every candidate ourselves. We build long-term relationships that allow us to understand your business and requirements, ultimately saving you time and money and delivering professionals we know will be successful. Register a vacancy with us to see how we can help you.

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Is in-house recruitment a better option than using a recruitment agency? With all eyes on budgets and the bottom line, some might argue that an in-house hiring process will save on cost – but does it deliver the same results, and how much is your internal team’s time worth? We’re exploring the pros and cons of in-house recruitment.

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Carmine Scalzo

by

Carmine Scalzo

Carmine Scalzo

by

Carmine Scalzo

Here’s how ABF assess & develop their future finance leaders
Here’s how ABF assess & develop their future finance leaders

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General

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Career Advice

14/05/18

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ABF’s Finance Development Programme Every year various ABF business units from around the world nominate individuals whom they believe have the potential to become future finance directors to join our Finance Development Programme. The programme is intended to provide them with support, resources and direction to accelerate their development.   Our Assessment Centre Before joining the programme all nominees have to attend an assessment centre which puts them through their paces and assesses them via: interviews, strategic reports, role play events and case studies. Those that pass the centre make it onto the programme. ABF invests significant money, time and effort into the assessment centres. A number of senior ABF employees give up their time to act as assessors; flying in from around the globe to do so. The assessors are supported by a number of experienced consultants who specialise in assessment programmes and talent assessment. The day itself is non-stop. Candidates are frantically going from one activity to the next and assessors are either busy assessing an activity or writing up candidate reports.  It’s all about the feedback The most impressive thing about the day is the quality of the feedback - once the nominees have finished all of their exercises, the assessors and consultants convene and each candidate is discussed in detail. This is a lengthy process and it concludes with both a decision as to who will progress on to the programme and an agreement on the feedback which will be given to each candidate. This comprehensive feedback includes observed strengths and development areas. For participants to get this level of feedback is invaluable; I have no doubt that it’s very useful for their future careers, whether they successfully make it onto the programme or not. As Finance Director at ABF, I think two things make the assessment centre really special: - How seriously ABF take the process and how well it is run. - The fact that the focus of the centre is on nurturing and growing talent. Whether candidates pass the assessment centre or not; what is different from many assessment centres is that the focus of the centre is not to rank candidates. It is all about giving each candidate really insightful feedback which will help the candidates grow and develop and hopefully become future finance directors within ABF. If you would like to learn more about ABF and our career opportunities, please visit the microsite here.  Guest author: Mark Ward - Finance Director at Allied Milling and Baking Group.

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Every year various ABF business units from around the world nominate individuals whom they believe have the potential to become future finance directors to join our Finance Development Programme.

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Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo

Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo

The Soft Skills Series Part 2: Critical communication at all levels
The Soft Skills Series Part 2: Critical communication at all levels

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Finance & Accounting

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Career Advice

11/04/16

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Let’s face it. Accountants aren’t always renowned for having top-notch communication skills, but for those seeking to reach the highest echelons, or even make it as Chief Finance Officer (CFO), getting this right is absolutely crucial. Workplaces where there is free-flowing communication are usually the most satisfying to work in and employees will get their key information and instruction from their manager. Beyond this, discussing the company’s goals and how employees are contributing to achieving these boost engagement and retention because there is a key vision for the business which is being achieved. Working with direct colleagues you get on with is a significant boost to morale but other relationships can be more challenging. Where you think someone is being difficult it is often worth exploring internally why you think this and being aware of subtle signals you might be giving off which encourage that behaviour. Skirting around issues and withholding information based on the perceived attitude of the other person can waste that most precious resource – time. At the Board level it is important that the CFO communicates with senior management, not just with direct peers, so key messages filter down. It is worth noting the leaders rated most highly on their communication skills accept and learn from their mistakes rather than taking a defensive stance. Translating data and numbers into something meaningful is a given for any finance professional worth their salt. The interpersonal dimension is where high-fliers can stand out from the crowd and is integral for management and dealing with colleagues – right up to the C-suite.

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Let’s face it. Accountants aren’t always renowned for having top-notch communication skills, but for those seeking to reach the highest echelons, or even make it as Chief Finance Officer (CFO), getting this right is absolutely crucial.

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Carmine Scalzo

by

Carmine Scalzo

Carmine Scalzo

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Carmine Scalzo