Financial Reporting (M&A) - Full time or Part time

£50000 - £55000 per annum
M&A_OX

Oxfordshire, Oxford

The details

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This is a brand new position in a blue chip organisation, the role will be critical to the future growth of the business, you will be a key point of contact for international departmental heads on a range of technical accounting topics. You will take ownership of the company's investment portfolio as they look to diversify their current offering. For this reason the role is perfect for someone with a practice background who is looking for their first or second move into industry. The company will drive your development and offer numerous progression opportunities with the wider business.

The main duties will include but won't be limited to:

  • Monthly management reporting on cash flow and investments
  • Provide best in class advice on international bids.
  • Assist with group budgeting & forecasting
  • Provide assistance and training to wider finance teams.
  • Drive process and control improvement across the business
  • The candidate:
  • Qualified Accountant (ACA/ACCA or CIMA)
  • A practice background is advantageous
  • Strong communication skills with the ability to influence at all levels
  • M&A experience is beneficial.If you're newly qualified from practice and would like to discuss a wide range of other opportunities we have then please send me an email matthew.brennan@markssattin.com or apply to the above position.
  • This role can also offer a large degree of flexibility and part time could be considered for the right candidate.
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Temporary role/Renewable energy/Part Qualified/Netsuite/General Ledger

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AH051220

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12/12/20

Aaron Howard

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Aaron Howard
Aaron Howard

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Aaron Howard
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