Financial Services Consultant

  1. Permanent
€49,699 - €67,771 per annum + Pension, Bonus, Healthcare
BBBH161323_1600274214

Dublin

The details

This is an exciting opportunity for experienced business analysts, project managers and change managers to join a growing organisation as they move through an interesting growth period. Our client are eager to add people who are interested in maximising operational efficiency, embracing digital change while supplying a strong customer centric experience

Candidates with previous experience in strategy, operations or change delivery roles within consulting or the Financial Services industry will join a dynamic organisation as they push growth and development in the coming years.

The successful applicant will:

  • Work as part of a high-performing team of problem solvers solve complex business issues from strategy to execution
  • Utilise your skills in the areas of structured problem solving, business analysis, analytics, design thinking and lean process improvement
  • Engage directly with senior client stakeholders to drive business outcomes
  • Be involved in projects across the end-to-end project lifecycle, from business case development to project and execution and close-out

The Successful candidate should have:

  • Strong understanding of core business operations gained through involvement/ delivery of projects across areas such as strategy, operating model design, customer experience design, lean process improvement, workforce productivity, organisational design and transformation design and delivery
  • Exceptional problem-solving ability including logical reasoning, creative thinking and the ability to untangle complex issues
  • Exceptional quantitative, analytical and financial modelling skills
  • Strong academic record including a relevant third level degree from top university
  • Strong Excel, PowerPoint and Visio skills
  • Lean six sigma qualification preferred
  • Project Management and/or Agile certification preferred

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