International Senior Billing Manager

  1. Permanent
£60,000 - £75,000 per annum
BBBH162279

Leeds, West Yorkshire

The details

This vacancy has now expired.

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Where you fit it?

You will be responsible for a team of 32 with 2 direct reports managing complex client arrangements in a business that offers flexibility in your approach and method of working.

Your role:

  • Financial client reporting
  • Reporting on monthly, quarterly and yearly activity
  • Training the team on operational processes
  • Working with IT to support and drive automation
  • Managing both internal and external relationships
  • Ensure the team are on top of billing requirements to meet deadlines

What you need?

You'll need to have exposure of client care and handling complex client arrangements with experience of developing and implementing financial controls. You must have a strong understanding of e-billing systems with the ability to demonstrate and prove capabilities in driving business and team.

In Return!

You'll be rewarded with a higher than industry standard salary for this level of position in a business that has the ability to offer development opportunities as you grow in to the role.

Please apply for more details, or if you'd rather email me direct, you can email your CV to my email, elizabeth.howe@marksattin.com

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