Investment Manager

  1. Permanent
€75,000 - €90,000 per annum + Extensive Bonus, Benefits
MFIM73838

Dublin

The details

Investment Manager - Dublin - Fund Management

Our client is a Boutique Asset Manager with operations in Dublin, London, Hong Kong and New York. With the appetite for their alternative and renewables focused funds extremely high they are keen to add to their high performing team here in Dublin with an experienced Investment Analyst.

Duties will not be limited to the below but a flavour……

  • Focus on the structuring of deals across the alternatives & renewables markets accountable for all aspects of investments across the investment life cycle from origination, management, execution, and implementation
  • Play a crucial role in driving performance of capital metrics, analysis and identification of capital opportunities and management actions
  • Conduct Financial modelling and valuations including market and technical sensitivity analysis
  • Interacting with external valuers on a monthly and quarterly basis
  • Preparing and assisting with deal specific proposals including drafting Investment Committee and board papers
  • Carrying out detailed market research
  • Developing and maintaining databases of relevant market information such as Investment transactions and developments
  • Involvement in investment / divestment processes

The ideal candidate will have gained at least 5/6 years Investment Analysis and or Corporate Finance experience and will have excellent Financial Modelling and or Valuations exposure. Technical ability coupled with strong Commercial Acumen are a pre requisite for this opportunity and exposure to ESG funds and or Renewables investments certainly a plus but not a pre requisite.

Academics will be in the form of a CFA, ACA, ACCA or equivalent level technical Masters.

This is a unique opportunity in the Irish market where you get to join a global boutique asset management firm doubling in size with new funds set to launch next year and beyond with the appetite for these funds exceptionally high.

For further information please contact Matt Fitzpatrick in Marks Sattin.

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