Private Equity Change Manager

  1. Permanent
£120,000 - £140,000 per annum
HA192091

City of London, London

The details

This leading, London based multi-strategy asset manager is looking to hire an experienced change or transformation professional to join as a change manager. You will have an opportunity to shape the direction of a rapidly growing company.

The role will see you join a newly formed transformation team whose focus is deploying a wide ranging change plan across all business areas to support the businesses continued rapid growth. The team will work with functions across the business on project planning and infrastructure to ensure consistent delivery.

You, as change manager, will be expected to take ownership of this thinking in conjunction with relevant stakeholders. You will work closely with the Head of Transformation, entailing responsibilities such as;

  1. Developing and agreeing the project charter with the relevant business stakeholders
  2. Setting up the project infrastructure, incl. project governance (e.g., Steering Commitee), working groups, project documentation
  3. Developing a project plan
  4. Managing project delivery, incl.
    1. Structuring of analyses / deliverables with relevant stakeholders and developing business requirement documents
    2. Coordinating delivery of project deliverables owned by other stakeholders
    3. Taking a hands-on approach in leading specific workstreams / being responsible for project deliverables
    4. Managing Steering commitees/Working Groups
    5. Managing the project plan, risks & issues, project reporting

The company itself is a top-tier name in alternative asset management with an exceptional track record. They have grown rapidly in recent years and are well positioned to capitalise on continued demand for alternative investments. They have a strong culture and a reputation for being a challenging and deeply rewarding environment to work in.

The ideal candidate will have extensive business process improvement and technology implementation experience, ideally within another alternative asset manager. Consulting experience within the Big4 or a strategy consulting firm is also valuable. You will be analytically minded with a proven track record and great interpersonal skills.

Remuneration will be in the region of £120,000 - £140,000 with discretionary bonus and other benefits.

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