Database Administrator/Developer - Legal systems exp

  1. Permanent
£35,000 - £50,000 per annum
JTDBA000001_1600785477

The details

Database Administrator/Developer - Legal Systems

Job Purpose

Your main responsibilities will include business systems administration and development. You will work with the IT team, the wider business and the Senior Developer to develop 3rd party and bespoke solutions across the firm and to provide application support to some of the firm's business critical applications including the Practise Management System (Partner for Windows).

Main Duties and Responsibilities:

This is not an exhaustive list and from time to time it may be necessary to vary these in order to meet the department and business needs:

* Database Administration and Development: Design, implement, maintain, document and

support the firm's the firm's SQL databases;

* Act as the primary technical resource for the Practise Management System (Partner for

Windows);

* Enhance and automate data flow between systems;

* Maintenance and support of the existing application estate;

* Developing, enhancing and documenting applications in line with the development

roadmap;

* Retrieving data and structuring management reports;

* Assisting in reviews of third party applications;

* Third line user support and training;

* Liaising with our managed service provider on development projects, training and

support;

* Input into business continuity and resilience;

* Liaising with 3rd party suppliers and support when other members of the IT department

are unavailable.

Person Specification

Required Skills

* High attention to detail with the ability to produce work/documentation of a consistently

high standard;

* Agile development practices and project planning;

* Experience of client and staff communication, presentation and demonstration;

* Good time management skills with the ability to prioritise workload, to have a flexible

approach to ensure all deadlines are met;

* Must be able to work as part of a team and possess excellent communication skills both

written and verbal;

* Knowledge of/experience with some/all of the technologies in use (including but not

limited to):

o SQL Server 2008-2019 (Essential. All others below desirable)

o Partner for Windows

o SSMS, TSQL, SSIS, indexing

o HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript/ES5, jQuery, JSON, REACT, XML/XSLT and

responsive design

o Visual Studio, ASP.NET, VB.NET, C#, Web forms, MVC, WebAPI, Entity

Framework, .NET Core, WPF/XAML

o REST & SOAP APIs and web services

o SVN/Git source control

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