Tax Accountant - Part Time

Negotiable
DCL1698878

The details

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Marks Sattin is recruiting for a Part Time Tax Accountant who is ideally looking to work 2 or 3 days a week. This is a perfect role for someone who is looking to either take a step back from a full time role or a parent looking for complete flexibility.

Working in an established team, you will be assisting with:

  • Preparation of monthly and quarterly reporting;
  • Preparation of the annual tax computations, including liaising with the relevant teams in Finance;
  • Managing the capital allowance information capture process;

Ideally you will have gained exposure across Corporate Tax and seek a business that is able to offer flexibility to fit in with your lifestyle.

Please contact David Clamp at Marks Sattin for more information.

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